Code of Conduct

  • Posted on: 17 March 2015
  • By: kissitadmin

Updated on 1 June 2016

Preliminary (Paragraph No.s 1-3)

1. Respect for the law and for the freedom of the individual citizen depend to a large extent on the maintenance of high standards by all who practise in the Courts.

2. Amendments and additions to this Code may be made by the Bar in General Meeting or alternatively by resolution of the Bar Council, which shall be operative upon such date as the resolution shall appoint, but may be revoked or amended by the Bar in General Meeting. Amendments and additions will be published from time to time in such manner as the Bar Council may determine.

3. Existing rulings of the Bar Council which have not been embodied in this Code or its Annexes remain available for guidance. The "Conduct and Etiquette at the Bar" by W.W. Boulton also remains available for guidance but only in respect of matters not embodied in this Code.

Application of the Code: Fundamental Principles (Paragraph No.s 4-6)

4. Every barrister whenever called to the Bar, whether in practice or not, should uphold at all times the standards set out in this Code, the dignity and high standing of the profession of barrister and his own standing as a member of it.

5. The Bar Council has no jurisdiction over the conduct of students from the Faculties of Law of the University of Hong Kong or the City University of Hong Kong or elsewhere employed during the summer vacation or of barristers' clerks or any employees; but

(a) a barrister is responsible for acts and omissions by his clerk or any employee, when acting on his behalf; and
(b) a barrister who takes a pupil (whether called to the Bar or not) should supervise his professional conduct during pupillage.

6. It is the duty of every barrister

(a) to comply with the provisions of this Code and with the undertakings (if any) which he made on his call to the Bar;
(b) not to engage in conduct (whether in pursuit of his profession or otherwise) which is dishonest or which may otherwise bring the profession of barrister into disrepute, or which is prejudicial to the administration of justice;
(c) to observe the ethics and etiquette of his profession;
(d) if a practising barrister, or an employed barrister acting under paragraph 1 83 of this Code, to be competent in all his professional activities.

Disciplinary Proceedings (Paragraph No.s 7-11)

7. Serious failure to comply with the duties set out in paragraph 6 shall be professional misconduct and, if so found by a Barristers Disciplinary Tribunal, shall render the barrister liable to be punished in accordance with the provisions of the Legal Practitioners Ordinance, Cap. 159. (Circular No. 57/93)

8. Any failure to comply with the duties set out in Paragraph 6 which does not, in the opinion of the Bar Council, amount to professional misconduct shall be a breach of proper professional standards and, if established to the satisfaction of the Bar Council, shall render the barrister liable either
(a) to be ordered to attend upon the Chairman or some other person nominated by the Bar Council in order that he should be

     (1) admonished or
     (2) given appropriate advice as to his future conduct or
(b) to be admonished by letter from the Chairman.

[The next paragraph number is 10.]

10. It is the duty of a barrister:

(a) to respond to any requirement from the Bar Council for comments or information or to attend the Special Committee on Discipline or any other nominated or appointed person when required to do so by the Bar Council, (Circular No. 06/94)
(b) to attend proceedings before a Barristers Disciplinary Tribunal when so required,
(c) to attend upon the Chairman or other nominated or appointed person when required to do so by the Bar Council under paragraph 8 above.

11. A barrister must report to the Bar Council if he is convicted of a criminal offence which involves dishonesty or which may bring the profession into disrepute. In case of doubt the offence should be reported.

Definition (Paragraph No.s 12-13)

12. In this Code (except for paragraph 140), the expression "Court" includes any court or tribunal or any other person or body whether sitting in public or private before whom a barrister appears as an advocate and save and unless otherwise provided words in the masculine gender include the feminine gender and where necessary words in the singular include the plural.

13. In this Code the expressions "professional chambers" and "chambers" mean premises used by one or more barristers to carry on their practices and not shared with persons who are not barristers. For example, business centres or other premises shared with persons who are not barristers are not professional chambers as defined in this Code. (Circular No. 019/04)

[The next paragraph number is 20.]

Practising Barristers - General Principles (Paragraph No.s 20-32)

20. Subject to paragraph 32, a practising barrister is a barrister who has been admitted to practise in Hong Kong and who is entitled and holds himself out as willing to appear in a court on behalf of a client or to give legal advice or services to a client; but is not an employed barrister.

21. A practising barrister is bound to accept any brief to appear before a Court in the field in which he professes to practise at his usual fee having regard to the type, nature, length and difficulty of the case. Special circumstances such as a conflict of interest or the possession of relevant and confidential information may justify his refusal to accept a particular brief.

22. A practising barrister may not, whether or not he is acting for a fee, supply legal advice or service to the public or to a section of the public otherwise than in the course of his practice save in the following circumstances:

(1) supplying legal advice or service in any country outside Hong Kong if the rules in force in that country permit barristers to do so;
(2) lecturing, teaching, writing or editing of legal text books or of articles in newspapers or journals;
(3) giving advice on legal matters free to a friend or relative;
(4) participating in the Duty Lawyer Service Free Legal Advice Scheme;
(5) acting as unpaid or honorary legal adviser to any charitable, benevolent or philanthropic institution;
(6) the giving by a barrister who is a non-executive director of a company or a trustee or governor of a charitable, benevolent or philanthropic institution or a trustee of any private trust to the other directors, trustees or governors (as the case may be) of the benefit of his learning and experience on matters of general policy and of general legal principle applicable to the affairs of the company, institution or trust. (Circular 15/99)
(7) subject to the prior approval of the Bar Council, giving advice on legal matters free in a scheme or programme established to the satisfaction of the Bar Council to further the purpose of promoting amongst the public greater awareness of their legal rights, or respect for the rule of law or otherwise promoting the objects of the Bar Association. (Circular 17/03)

23.

(1) A barrister may not, without the permission of the Bar Council, or save as provided for in Annex 4A to this Code, become or remain a practising barrister unless he is willing for his practice to be his primary occupation; and he may not engage directly or indirectly in any other occupation if his association with that occupation may adversely affect the reputation of the Bar. (Circular No. 009/09)
(2) A practising barrister must not engage directly or indirectly in any other occupation if his association with that occupation may prejudice his ability to attend properly to the interests of his clients.
(3) (a) A practising barrister who wishes to engage in a supplementary occupation should do so only in accordance with the general or special permission of the Bar Council.
     (b) Supplementary occupations for which the Bar Council has granted general permission are set out in a List of Approved Supplementary Occupations in Annex 4 and in the List of Approved Occupations in Annex 4A to this Code. A practising barrister who wishes to engage in an occupation not listed in Annex 4 or Annex 4A or is in doubt whether a proposed occupation is within the approved list should seek the special permission of the Bar Council before taking up the occupation. (Circular No.      009/09) 
(4) (a) Save in the instance where general permission is given in Annex 4, a practising barrister may not be an executive director of a company without seeking special permission from the Bar Council; and he may not, as a non-executive director, do work for the company which would ordinarily be done by an executive director.
     (b) A practising barrister may not, as a director, undertake legal work for the company which, as a barrister, he could only undertake if instructed by a person authorised to instruct him in the matter. For example, he may not draft documents or appear for the company in proceedings, enquiries or arbitration.
     (c) A practising barrister may, as a director, give to the board the benefit of his learning and experience on matters of general policy and of general legal principles which are applicable to the company's affairs.
     (d) He should ensure that his advice is compatible with his position as a director and is not of the kind which he would give as a barrister advising a client. For example, it would be proper for him to draw the attention of the board to the general effect of an Ordinance on the company's affairs or to advise that the company's terms of business needed revision; but it would be wrong for him to undertake to revise the terms of business himself.
     (e) He should, therefore, avoid becoming concerned in specific legal matters affecting the company. There may, however, be circumstances in which it would be proper for him to give his advice in relation to a specific problem, either in a general way or as a matter of urgency. In these circumstances, he should ensure that the company consults its solicitors as soon as the matter reaches the point at which such consultation would normally take place.
(5) A barrister who is a pupil must apply himself full time to his pupillage save that a pupil may, with the approval of the Bar Council, engage in part time occupation which does not materially interfere with his pupillage. The general permission to engage in supplementary occupations in Annex 4, or in occupations listed in Annex 4A, does not apply to barristers serving pupillage. (Circular No. 15/99; Circular No. 009/09)

24. A practising barrister may not use or permit the use of his professional qualification for the advancement of any other occupation in which he is directly or indirectly engaged or for private advantage, save in relation to any occupations which involve the skills of a barrister. (Circular No. 009/09)

25. A barrister may not practise unless:

(a) he has or is a member of or is temporarily permitted the use of professional chambers; or
(b) he is a pupil of a practising barrister and is otherwise qualified to practise.
Provided that a barrister may use such temporary chambers as may be provided or approved by the Bar Council.

26. A barrister who is a member of professional chambers must:

(a) have his name exhibited at the chambers;
(b) have the right to make such use of the chambers, and of its administration and facilities, as his practice requires;
Subject to such exceptions as may be approved by the Bar Council a barrister's private residence or any part thereof may not be regarded as professional chambers.

27. A barrister may not be a member of more than one set of professional chambers in Hong Kong. (Circular 012/08)

28. A partnership is not permissible between practising barristers. Two or more practising barristers may agree to share professional expenses, either in proportion to their receipts or in any other way; but they may not (save as provided in paragraphs 81 to 83) agree to share professional receipts or agree that any one or more of them shall assume responsibility for the professional work of the other or others.

29.

(1) A person who intends to practise as a barrister must serve the period of approved pupillage which shall, subject to reduction by the Chief Judge, be:

(a) a period of not less than 12 months in the chambers of a junior barrister who, save in exceptional circumstances established to the satisfaction of the Bar Council, has continuously practised for not less than 5 years after commencement of full practice at the Bar in Hong Kong; or
(b) a period of not less than 9 months in the Department of Justice, which may include a period not exceeding 3 months on secondment to the Legal Aid Department, so long as he has also spent a period of not less than 3 months in such service as is described in sub-paragraph (a) above.

(2) Subject to the Bar Council's approval, the period of approved pupillage mentioned in (1) above may include:

(a) any period not exceeding 1 month spent as a judge's marshall in Hong Kong; and
(b) any period not exceeding 3 months as a pupil with a Senior Counsel.
(3) Save in exceptional circumstances, the Bar Council is unlikely to approve pupillage of less than 3 months with any one barrister.
(4) A person who is a pupil may not accept an instruction to act as a barrister unless he has been admitted as such, holds a valid limited practising certificate issued by the Bar Council and has the consent of his pupil master to accept such instruction. (Circular No. 052/03)

29A. A junior barrister, upon taking silk, may, for the period of one year following his appointment as a Senior Counsel, continue with his pre-existing commitments as a Pupil Master, and any period of pupillage undertaken in such circumstances will be counted towards the required period of pupillage to be undertaken by a barrister intending to practise. (Circular No. 32/93)

30. A barrister who acts as a Pupil Master may not seek or accept any pupillage fee, and must use his best endeavours to ensure that his Pupil complies with the requirements of paragraph 29
(4). The Rules concerning the duties of Pupil Masters and Pupils are at Annex 5. (Circular No. 052/03)

[The next paragraph number is 32.]

32. A barrister whose primary occupation is that of editor or reporter in Hong Kong of any series of law reports entirely written and edited by barristers shall be a practising barrister. Such a barrister is not required to comply with paragraphs 25, 26 and 50 of this Code of Conduct if he does not also hold himself out as willing to appear in a Court on behalf of a client or to give legal advice or services to a client.

[The next paragraph number is 50.]

The Acceptance of Instructions (Paragraph No.s 50-66)

50.

(a) Subject to such exceptions as may be authorised by custom or the Bar Council as set out in Annex 20, a barrister may not act in a professional capacity except upon the instructions of a solicitor or the Director of Legal Aid or the Government. Notwithstanding that he does so for no fee, a barrister who appears in or drafts a formal document for the purpose of a contentious matter is acting in a professional capacity. There is, however, no objection to a barrister giving advice free on legal matters to a friend or relative or on a charitable basis.

(b) Subject to the Direct Professional Access Rules set out in Annex 19, Annex 19A, Annex 19B, Annex 19C, (Circular No. 109/00), Annex 19D (Circular No. 008/05), Annex 19E (Circular No. 053/07), Annex 19F (Circular No. 095/11), Annex 19G (Circular No. 095/11), Annex 19H (Circular No. 052/12) , Annex 19I (Circular No. 053/15), and Annex 19J (Circular No. 066/16), a barrister may accept instructions from a member of a "recognised professional body" without the intervention of a solicitor in any matter of a kind which falls generally within the professional expertise of the members of the recognised professional body. For the purpose of this Code, a "recognised professional body" means a professional body which has been approved by the Bar Council as set out in paragraph 2(f) of Annex 20 for the purpose of "Direct Professional Access work" and "Direct Professional Access work" means work undertaken by a practising barrister pursuant to a brief or instructions delivered by a member of a recognised professional body in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules.

51. The rules for the acceptance of instructions by Senior Counsel are at Annex 6.

52. Subject to paragraphs 73 and 73B and to such exceptions as may be authorised by custom or by the Bar Council, a barrister may not appear before any Court without a fee marked on his brief or a statement that no fee is payable or the words "Legal Aid."

53. A barrister may not accept any brief or instructions which limit or seek to limit his ordinary authority or discretion.

54. The papers in any brief or instructions delivered to a barrister are normally the property of the client. The barrister has no right without the consent of the client to lend them or to reveal their contents to any person otherwise than as may be necessary for the proper discharge of his duties as Counsel or Pupil Master.

55. A barrister who finds on receiving a brief or instructions that acceptance of the papers would amount to his replacing another barrister who has previously been instructed in the same matter should inform that barrister that the papers have been delivered to him save where the brief or instructions have been returned by that barrister or the person instructing him in the matter has already informed that barrister of the termination of his service or there has been no reasonable opportunity to inform him before the hearing.

56. A barrister may not, save with the permission of the Bar Council, accept a brief or instructions in any matter with which he has previously been concerned in the course of another profession or occupation, or with which any firm or company in which he has been a partner or director or by which he has been employed has been so concerned during the period of his partnership, directorship or employment.

56A.

(a) Subject to sub-paragraph (b), a barrister may, but is not obliged to, accept instructions limited to a particular matter or issue in the proceedings, such as an application to adjourn the proceedings, and may withdraw from further participation in the proceedings after carrying out those instructions.
(b) Apart from instructions to apply for an adjournment of the proceedings or a part thereof, a barrister may only accept limited instructions in criminal proceedings if satisfied that the accused person will continue to be represented after his withdrawal therefrom upon the carrying out of those instructions.
(c) A barrister may not appear before any Court on limited instructions without a brief or backsheet marked with the words "Limited Instructions".
(d) Where a barrister accepts instructions limited to applying for an adjournment of the proceedings or a part thereof, he shall inform the Court before which he has been instructed to appear of the limited nature of his instructions at the first available opportunity after his acceptance of such instructions. (Circular No. 85/95)

Embarrassment and Conflict of Interest

57. No barrister is obliged to accept a brief if he has previously advised or drawn pleadings or appeared for another person on or in connection with the same matter; and he ought not to accept a brief or advise or draft pleadings if he would be embarrassed in the discharge of his duties and, if he has received any such brief or instructions inadvertently, he should return the same. A barrister will be so embarrassed if, for example, he has material information which was entrusted to him in confidence by or on behalf of his previous client. If, after the delivery of a brief or instructions on behalf of more than one client, there appears to be a conflict of interest between them, a barrister may not continue to act for any such client unless all such clients consent to his so acting and he is able to do so without embarrassment. Even if there be no conflict of interest, when a barrister has held a brief for any party in any proceeding he shall not accept a brief on an appeal or further stage in such proceeding for any other party without giving the original client the opportunity of delivering a brief to him for such appeal or further stage.

58. A barrister may not accept a brief or instructions in any case where by reason of his connection with the client it would be difficult for him to maintain his professional independence. Examples of the operation of this rule are given in Annex 7.

59. A barrister may not accept a brief or instructions in any case where by reason of his connection with the Court or a member thereof the impartial administration of justice might appear to be prejudiced. Examples of the application of this rule in regard to judicial position and family relationship are given in Annex 8.

60. A barrister may not appear as Counsel:

(a) in a matter in which he himself is a party or has a significant or significant pecuniary interest.
(b) either for or against any company of which he is an officer or in which he has directly or indirectly a significant pecuniary interest. Exceptions may be authorised by the Bar Council. (Examples of the operation of this rule are given in Annex 7.)

61. A barrister may not accept instructions in a case in which he has reason to believe that he is likely to be a witness. If, being engaged in a case, it becomes apparent that he is likely to be a witness on a material question of fact he should not continue to appear as Counsel if he can retire without jeopardising his client's interests.

62. A barrister whose lay client behaves in an offensive manner must nevertheless continue to act unless:

(a) he is justified in assuming that his instructions have been withdrawn (in which event he should discuss the position with the person instructing him in the matter or his representative before withdrawing from the case); or
(b) he finds that his professional conduct is being or is likely to be impugned and he can withdraw from the case at that stage without jeopardising his lay client's interests. The Return of Briefs

63.

(a) If a barrister receives a brief or instructions which he believes to be beyond his competence, he should decline that brief or those instructions and so inform the instructing solicitor.
(b) If a barrister receives instructions and it is or becomes apparent to him that he cannot do the work within a reasonable time, he should inform the instructing solicitor forthwith.
(c) If a barrister receives instructions where a time limit has been set for the completion of the work, and the barrister sees no reasonable prospect of his being able to finish the work within that time limit, he should either return the instructions forthwith or obtain further time from the person instructing him in the matter forthwith.

64. Briefs are in general accepted on the understanding that the barrister concerned may be unavoidably prevented by a conflicting professional engagement from attending the case. A barrister must inform the person instructing him in the matter as soon as there is an appreciable risk that he may not be able to undertake a brief which he has accepted; and he must in any event return that brief in sufficient time to allow for another barrister to be engaged and to master the brief.

65. When a barrister has accepted a brief for the defence of a person charged with a serious criminal offence he should so far as practicable ensure that the risk of a conflicting professional engagement does not arise. If, in the event, a barrister is instructed in a civil case which clashes with instructions to defend a person on a serious criminal charge, he should, save in exceptional circumstances, return the brief in the civil case.

66. A barrister is not justified in returning a brief for a fixed date, when once accepted, in order to attend a social or other non-professional engagement.

[The next paragraph number is 70.]

Administration (Paragraph No.s 70-73I)

70. It is the duty of a barrister at all times to ensure that his practice is efficiently and properly administered. In particular, a barrister must take all reasonable and practicable steps to ensure that professional engagements are fulfilled or that early notice is given if they cannot be fulfilled. In the interests of the efficient administration of justice and respect for the Court, a barrister must use his best endeavours always to be punctual.

71. A barrister who is the head of a set of chambers is responsible for seeing:

(a) that the chambers are administered competently and efficiently;
(b) that the affairs of the chambers are conducted in a manner which is fair and equitable for all members and Pupils. All other members must use their best endeavours to achieve these objects.

72. Except in the case of Direct Professional Access work, a barrister must ensure that:

(a) the date of receipt is marked on every brief for him to appear at a Court,
(b) proper records are kept in his chambers including a record of the date of receipt of each brief or set of papers; the name of the case; the names of the person and the firm or other body of which that person is a partner, member or employee instructing him in the matter; and where appropriate, the fee.

73. A barrister when instructed by a person authorised by custom or the Bar Council in a matter must ensure that on every occasion when he appears before a Court he has in his possession a backsheet bearing the particulars set out in paragraphs 73B(1) and (2) below insofar as such particulars are applicable mutatis mutandis.

(Circulars No. 6/94 & 26/95)

73A. In the case of instructions other than from a person authorised by custom or the Bar Council, the first point of contact in instructing a barrister (or a member of his staff authorised to accept instructions on his behalf) in a matter must be by the instructing solicitor personally and not by a member of his staff. A barrister may not accept instructions from a solicitor's or solicitors' firm without having made this first point of contact.

73B.

(1) Subject to paragraph 73 and except when appearing in a Magistrates Court on the instructions of the Government, a barrister must ensure that on every occasion when he appears before a Court he has in his possession a backsheet bearing the following information:-

(a) the name of the case, and if available, of the number assigned to the case by the Court;
(b) the name of the barrister;
(c) the name of the solicitor or solicitors' firm instructing or where appropriate, the Legal Aid Department or the Department of Justice;
(d) the name of the instructing solicitor;
(e) the file reference of the instructing firm or the Legal Aid Department or the Department of Justice for the case;
(f) the Court in which the case is listed for hearing;
(g) the date or dates of hearing;
(h) the nature of the work to be done; and
(i) except for prosecution briefs and briefs on behalf of the Government, the agreed fee and any agreed refresher or "Legal Aid" or "No Fee" as appropriate.

(2)

(a) In a criminal matter, the backsheet referred to in sub-paragraph (1) above shall be signed by the person instructing the barrister in the matter in his personal signature. (Circular No. 72/96) 
(b) In any other matter, the backsheet referred to in sub-paragraph (1) above shall be signed by the person instructing the barrister in the matter either in his personal signature or in the name of the solicitor's or solicitors' firm instructing. (Circular No. 72/96)

(3) Unless provided by the person instructing him in the matter with a backsheet satisfying the aforesaid requirements, a barrister may not appear in the case in question.

73C. Where after the first point of contact referred to in paragraph 73A above, a barrister is instructed on behalf of a firm of solicitors by a person not legally qualified, that is being a person who is neither a solicitor nor a trainee solicitor (hereinafter "an unqualified person") whether in connection with a criminal or civil matter:-

(1) to provide legal advice or assistance, whether orally, in writing or in any other manner; or
(2) to make a professional visit to a client or potential client and, in relation to criminal matters, in particular, at a police station or at the premises of some other law enforcement or custodial agency; and if, when rendering such advice or assistance or upon attendance at the place or Court in question, the instructing solicitor is not present, the barrister may only accept such instructions if, and may not act professionally in relation to such case unless prior to any professional work being rendered by the barrister:-

(a) (whether or not such person is known to the barrister) the unqualified person identifies himself to the barrister and produces his Hong Kong Permanent Identity Card to the barrister for inspection;
(b) the barrister satisfies himself of the identity of the person so instructing by inspection of his said Hong Kong Permanent Identity Card;
(c) if and insofar as no backsheet has yet been provided, the unqualified person so instructing provides the barrister with a backsheet satisfying the requirements of sub-paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), (h) and (i) of paragraph 73B(1) of the Code; and
(d) the barrister endorses on his backsheet the name of the unqualified person so instructing him and the number of his Hong Kong Permanent Identity Card shown to him as aforesaid.

73D.

(1) Following acceptance of instructions as provided under paragraph 73C hereof, if and insofar as he has not already received a backsheet signed as hereinafter described, it shall be the barrister's duty to call for and to receive from the instructing solicitor, as soon as practicable and in any event not more than 7 days after being so instructed, a backsheet satisfying the requirements of sub-paragraphs (a), (b), (c), (d), (e), (h) and (i) of paragraph 73B(1) of this Code and signed personally by the instructing solicitor.
(2) If such a signed backsheet is not received within 7 days of the first point of contact as provided in paragraph 73A, it shall be the barrister's duty thereupon forthwith to send to the firm of solicitors named on his backsheet provided pursuant to paragraph 73C, marked for the attention of the instructing solicitor a copy of that backsheet with a request in writing that the instructing solicitor do forthwith on behalf of his firm deliver to the barrister a confirmatory backsheet personally signed by him.

73E. In the event that:-

(1) the barrister receives no reply to his request for a signed backsheet within 21 days after the first point of contact as provided in paragraph 73D(1); or
(2) the solicitor to whom he has sent a copy of his backsheet pursuant to paragraph 73D(2) disclaims the purported instructions; or
(3) for any other reason, the barrister fails to obtain a signed backsheet as aforesaid;
it shall be the duty of the barrister promptly and in any event within 28 days after the first point of contact as provided in paragraph 73A to report to the Bar Council his failure to receive such signed backsheet, enclosing a copy of the backsheet which he did obtain from the unqualified person giving instructions and setting out all material information for the Bar Council consideration.

73F.

(1) A barrister shall issue a written fee note in respect of all professional work done to the company, firm or other body upon whose instructions such work was done, marked for the attention of the person instructing him.
(2) Except when appearing on behalf of the Government or the Duty Lawyer Service or with the prior written permission of the Bar Council, a barrister shall in any case only accept payment of his professional fees by cheque either drawn on the account of the company, firm or other body instructing him or sent directly by such company, firm or other body in satisfaction of his fees by reference to his fee note and in no circumstances may he accept payment of his professional fees in cash. (Circular No. 85/95) 
(3) Upon receipt of payment in respect of his fee note, the barrister shall issue a written receipt in respect thereof and send the same to the firm instructing, marked for the attention of the instructing solicitor.

73G. It is the duty of every barrister to retain in his custody or control for at least two years from the date when the same was first made or received by the barrister, legible copies of the following documents in respect of each and every case or matter on which he has been instructed, namely:-

(1) any backsheet obtained by the barrister pursuant to paragraphs 73B(1), 73C(2)(c) and 73D hereof;
(2) all fee notes rendered in the case or matter in question;
(3) all receipts issued in respect of fees paid in the case or matter in question which should be endorsed by or on behalf of the barrister with the details of all cheques by which such payments were made;
(4) any letter or other written communication from the barrister requesting delivery of a signed confirmatory backsheet pursuant to paragraph 73D hereof;
(5) any letter or other written communication in response to the barrister's request for a signed confirmatory backsheet;
(6) any letter or other written communication from the barrister to the Bar Council reporting his failure to obtain a signed backsheet pursuant to paragraph 73E hereof; and
(7) any letter or other written communication from the company, firm or other body instructing in relation to the payment of the barrister's fees.

73H. The Chairman or Vice-Chairman of the Bar Association or such other person as the Chairman or the Bar Council may authorize so to act may orally or in writing require a barrister:-

(1) to produce forthwith for inspection his backsheet as required under paragraphs 73B(1), 73C(c) and 73D;
(2) to produce forthwith or at any specified time, being a reasonable time of day, for inspection by any person or persons, including any Inspector appointed by the Law Society pursuant to section 8AA of the Legal Practitioners Ordinance, Cap 159, the copy records required to be retained by the barrister pursuant to the preceding paragraph of this Code;
(3) to permit the person or persons named in the request (should the same regard such course of action convenient) to make copies of such records and if necessary, to remove them from the barrister's chambers for this purpose on their providing him with a receipt listing the documents so removed and an undertaking to return the originals to him after copying the same; or
(4) to provide forthwith or by any stated time, any information requested by the Chairman, Vice-Chairman or the Bar Council touching or bearing upon the instructions received by the barrister and the basis and terms on which he became involved and participated in any specified case or matter including, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, the amount and manner of payment of fees received by him in respect thereof.

73I. The Bar Council shall, in its absolute discretion, be entitled to use or authorize use of the results of such inspection, of copies made of records and of information supplied as aforesaid, as evidence in or otherwise in connection with any disciplinary proceedings brought or contemplated by or on behalf of the Bar Council or the Law Society or, save where the privilege against self-incrimination is claimed, prosecution under the Legal Practitioners Ordinance, Cap. 159.

[The next paragraph number is 80.]

Delegation of Work (Paragraph No. 80-84)

80. Except as provided in paragraph 151, a barrister may not hand over his brief to another barrister to take his place and to conduct the case as if the latter barrister had himself been instructed unless the person instructing him in the matter consents.

81. A barrister who has been instructed to draft any document or advise in writing may not delegate this responsibility to another barrister; but he may obtain assistance in the performance of such work provided he makes himself personally responsible for the contents of the completed work.

82. It is the duty of a barrister who arranges for another barrister to undertake work on his behalf (other than a Pupil or a person who has asked to do the work in order to increase his own skill or experience):

(a) to pay proper financial remuneration for the work done;
(b) to make payment within a reasonable time and in any event within two months after the work has been done, unless otherwise agreed in advance with the barrister concerned;
(c) to deal with payment for such work himself and not delegate responsibility to anyone else.

Proper financial remuneration in respect of the conduct of hearings involving evidence or argument, or the execution of paper work, should not ordinarily be less than half the fee charged by the principal.

In respect of the holding of a brief for a hearing which the principal barrister may not be able to attend but which he in fact does attend, and in respect of any other work not mentioned above, the remuneration should be such as to compensate the other barrister adequately for the work done, the time spent and the expense (if any) which he has incurred. Although the provisions of this paragraph do not apply to work done by Pupils, and although a Pupil has no right or expectation to receive remuneration from another barrister for whom the Pupil has undertaken work at any stage of his pupillage, the said barrister should remunerate the Pupil where the Pupil has done work of value to him at any stage of his pupillage.
(Circular No. 051/07)

83. In a Legal Aid case, the barrister who carries out the actual work which is the subject of a brief or instructions shall, as between the barristers concerned, be entitled to the fee. When a barrister carries out part only of such work, division of the fee shall be a matter of arrangement between the barristers concerned and the Legal Aid Department.

84. A junior barrister may accept a brief to take notes for a party to an action or for some person interested therein, but, if so instructed, he may not take any part in the trial or hearing or do anything other than comply with his instructions.

[The next paragraph number is 90.]

Relation Between Barristers and Persons or Bodies Instructing Them (Paragraph No.s 90-94)

90. A barrister may not have a seat in the office of any person authorised to instruct him or in the office of the company, firm or other body of which such person is a director, partner, member or employee.

91. A barrister should not attend a conference at or visit the office of the person authorised to instruct him in the matter or the office of the company, firm or other body of which such person is a director, partner, member or employee to collect a brief unless there is a good reason for departing from the general rule.

92. A barrister may not give a commission or present to any person who introduces professional work to him.

93. A barrister may not lend to any person authorised to instruct him or the company, firm or other body of which such person is a director, partner, member or employee any sum of money for the purpose of financing the practice of such person, company, firm, or other body, or for any other professional purpose.

94. There is no objection to barristers accepting social invitations from persons authorised to instruct him or companies, firms or other bodies of which they are directors, partners, members or employees, nor, subject to the rules against advertising, touting and publicity, extending such invitations to such persons, companies, firms or other bodies.

[The next paragraph number is 101.]

Practice Promotion (Paragraph No.s 101-107)

100. [Deleted] (Bar Circular Nos. 105/08, 014/09)

101.

(1) Subject to sub-paragraph (2), a barrister may engage in advertising or promotion in connection with his practice and such advertising or promotion may include:

(a) subject to paragraphs 105 and 107 hereinafter, photographs or other illustrations of the barrister;
(b) statements about the nature and extent of the barrister’s services and experience;
(c) statements about the barrister’s education, qualifications, affiliations and membership;
(d) statements of rates and methods of charging;
(e) information about the barrister’s involvement in any case in which the barrister has acted (including the name of any client for whom the barrister has acted) where such information has already become publicly available or, where it has not already become publicly available, with the express prior written consent of the lay client 1.

(2) Advertising or promotion must not:

(a) be inaccurate, unverifiable or likely to mislead;
(b) be likely to diminish public confidence in the legal profession or the administration of justice or otherwise bring the legal profession or the administration of justice into disrepute;
(c) make comparisons with or criticisms of other barristers, solicitors or members of any other profession;
(d) include statements about the quality of the barrister’s work, his earnings or success of his practice or his success rate;
(e) indicate or imply any willingness to accept a brief or instructions or any intention to restrict the persons from whom a brief or instructions may be accepted otherwise than in accordance with this Code;
(f) be offensive or otherwise inappropriate having regard to the manner, medium, frequency of approach or surrounding circumstances 2;
(g) be calculated or likely to exploit or manipulate the weak or vulnerable state of the recipient or intended recipient;
(h) take place in or in the immediate vicinity of a hospital or similar medical establishment, court, tribunal, police station or place of detention;
(i) be directed at a person who has made known a desire not to be contacted;
(j) be inappropriate having regard to the best interest of the public;

-----

See also UK Bar Code of Conduct para. (d)
2 For para. (f) to (j) see also “Practice Promotion Code” of the Law Society of Hong Kong para. 6(h), (i), (j), (k), (m)

(k) except where permitted in paragraph 101(1) hereinabove, include the name of any professional or lay client.

(3) A barrister shall retain for one year after the date of publication a copy or record of each item of advertising or promotional material authorized by him. Any advertising or promotion relating to a barrister shall be presumed, subject to proof by the barrister to the contrary, to have been authorized by him.

(4) When called upon by the Bar Council to do so, a barrister shall verify the statements made in any advertising or promotional material authorized by him.

(5) The Bar Council may by notice in writing to a barrister order the alteration or withdrawal of any item of advertising or promotional material where the Bar Council is of the opinion that such material contravenes the provisions in this paragraph.

(6) The provisions of this paragraph apply to a practising barrister, an employed barrister and a barrister serving pupillage. (Bar Circular Nos. 105/08, 014/09)

102. [Deleted] (Bar Circular Nos. 105/08, 014/09)

103. [Deleted] (Bar Circular Nos. 105/08, 014/09)

104. [Deleted] (Bar Circular Nos. 105/08, 014/09)

105. A barrister shall not without leave of the Bar Council appear in wig and/or gown outside the precincts of the court except upon the occasion of the opening of the legal year. (Bar Circular Nos. 105/08, 014/09)

106. [Deleted] (Bar Circular Nos. 105/08, 014/09)

107. A barrister shall not without leave of the Bar Council provide or publish a photograph of himself in wig and/or gown for the purpose of practice promotion. (Bar Circular Nos. 105/08, 014/09)

108. [Deleted] (Bar Circular Nos. 105/08, 014/09).

[The next paragraph number is 110.]

Duty of Counsel to the Lay Client (Paragraph 110-116A)

110. A barrister has a duty to uphold the interests of his client without regard to his own interests or to any consequences to himself or to any other person.

111. A barrister has the same privilege as his client of asserting and defending the client's rights by the statement of every fact and the use of every argument that is permitted by the principles and practice of the law.

112. If a barrister forms the view that there is a conflict of interest between his lay client and the person instructing him in the matter or the company, firm or other body of which such a person is a director, partner, member or employee, he should advise that it would be in the lay client's interest to instruct another person authorised to instruct him in the matter. Such advice should be given either in writing or at a conference at which both the person instructing him in the matter and the lay client are present.

113. A barrister instructed to settle a pleading is under responsibilities to the Court as well as to his client. He may not make any allegation unsupported by his instructions. He may not allege fraud unless: (a) he has clear instructions to plead fraud, and (b) he has before him reasonably credible material which, as it stands, establishes a prima facie case of fraud.

114. In a criminal appeal to the Court of Appeal a barrister should not settle grounds of appeal unless he considers that the proposed appeal is properly arguable.

115. In legally-aided civil cases a barrister's primary duty remains owed to his lay client but circumstances may arise where a barrister becomes of the opinion that an assisted person, for example, no longer has a reasonable prospect of success, or has required the case to be conducted or continued unreasonably in which case a barrister must comply with the provisions of Regulations 12(7) and (8) of the Legal Aid Regulations, which are reproduced at Annex 10.

116. A barrister employed as Counsel is under a duty not to communicate to any third person information which has been entrusted to him in confidence, and not to use such information to his client’s detriment or to his own or another client’s advantage. This duty continues after the relation of Counsel and client has ceased. A barrister’s duty not to divulge confidential information without the consent of his client, express or implied, subsists unless he is compelled or permitted to do so by law.

116A. Where appropriate, a barrister should consider with his or her clients the possibility of attempting to resolve a dispute or any particular issue thereof by way of mediation. (Circular No. 010/09)

[The next paragraph number is 120.]

Fees (Paragraph No.s 120-127)

120. A barrister should be separately instructed and remunerated by a separate fee for each item of work which he undertakes. The fee marked on a brief covers perusal of the brief as well as the preparation and conduct of the case in Court. Refreshers, if any, must be agreed before the hearing and may, but need not, be marked on the brief.

120A. It is improper for a barrister to accept a gift of money from a lay client in addition to a brief fee provided that interest on unpaid fees, if so agreed, would not be considered as a gift of money. (Circular No. 72/97)

121. A barrister may not undertake to represent any person, authority or organisation for a fixed salary; and he may not accept a fixed fee for advising over a fixed period; nor, save in specific circumstances which may be authorised by the Bar Council, may he accept a single brief marked with a single fee to appear on behalf of a client in more than one case or matter.

122. A barrister shall not be deemed to have accepted a brief or to have acquiesced in any fee marked on it until he has had a reasonable opportunity to examine the contents of the brief and to consider other matters relevant to the fee for the purpose of determining the adequacy thereof.

123. When a brief has been accepted with knowledge of its contents and other matters relevant to the fee, no request may be made for the fee to be increased unless circumstances arise which increase substantially the burden and responsibility on the barrister concerned. In any case where an increase of the original fee is considered to be justified, the person instructing him in the matter must be so informed without delay, and, save in exceptional circumstances, no request for an increase of the original fee may be made at a time so close to the hearing of the case that the person instructing him in the matter would be prejudiced in electing to brief another barrister.

124. A barrister may not accept a brief or instructions on terms that payment of fees shall depend upon or be related to a contingency. For the avoidance of doubt nothing in this rule shall prevent a member from accepting payment of his fees by installments and payment of interest on his fees either as agreed or allowed on taxation. (Circular No. 040/04)

125. In privately-paid cases, it is proper for a barrister to discuss and agree the amount of the fee personally with the person instructing him in the matter. But he may also do so through his clerk or secretary.

126. It is the duty of a barrister to remunerate his staff as may be agreed between them, provided that no barrister shall share or agree to share with any person (including his clerk) his fees by paying a commission or otherwise a percentage of the barrister's earnings.

127. The following sub-paragraphs are for the information and guidance of barristers:-

(a) Agreement was reached between the Bar Council and the Council of the Law Society in 1980 relating to "Payment of Counsel's Fees" and "Marking of Counsel's Diary". Details were contained in Circular No. 6/81 subject to the "Revision to Principle 12.04: Solicitors Personally Responsible For Barristers' Fees" contained in Circular No. 27/97 sent to all members of the Law Society of Hong Kong and are reproduced here as Annex 18(i) and (ii).
(b) It was further agreed between the Bar Council and the Council of the Law Society that a barrister may submit fee notes to instructing solicitors as soon as any particular piece of work is completed, e.g., after the settling of pleadings, the giving of opinions or the holding of a conference, and shall in any event submit, within 2 weeks, a note in relation to outstanding fees when requested so to do by his instructing solicitors. This agreement does not apply to cases where the barrister's fees have been agreed at a lump sum for a particular matter which is uncompleted. Further the Law Society of Hong Kong has agreed that it is not intended that any particular penalty will be imposed if the fee note is not submitted within the time limit specified above.
(c) In the case of Direct Professional Access work, it has been agreed between the Bar Council and the recognised professional bodies that (i) a barrister shall be entitled to require payment of his fees at the time of accepting instructions; (ii) an interim fee note of the barrister may be submitted at intervals of not less than two months; and (iii) the barrister's fees shall be paid or challenged promptly and in any event within two months of the submission of his fee note.
(d) The Bar Council and the Council of the Law Society have agreed to set up a joint tribunal to adjudicate disputes regarding counsel's fees. The terms of reference and procedure of the Joint Tribunal are reproduced here as Annex 18(iii).

[The next paragraph number is 130.]

Conduct at Court (Paragraph No.s 130-163)

130. A barrister must not knowingly deceive or mislead the Court.

131. In all cases it is the duty of a barrister to guard against being made the channel for questions or statements which are only intended to insult or annoy either the witness or any other person or otherwise are an abuse of Counsel's function, and to exercise his own judgment both as to the substance and the form of the questions put or statements made.

132. A barrister must not, when conducting his case, assert his personal opinion of the facts or the law to the Court.

133. A barrister must at all times act with due courtesy to the Court before which he is appearing. He must in every case use his best endeavours to avoid unnecessary expense and waste of the Court's time. He should, when asked, inform the Court of the probable length of his case; and he should also inform the Court of any developments which affect the information already provided.

134. A barrister should at once inform the Court of a settlement or of an intention to apply for an adjournment or (provided he can do so without prejudice to his client's interests) of any other matter which may affect the estimated length of hearing.

135. Subject to the provisions of this Code, a barrister should conduct cases in such manner as in his discretion he thinks will be most to the advantage of his client.

136. In civil and, subject to the provisions of paragraph 154, in criminal cases, a barrister must ensure that the Court is informed of any relevant decision on a point of law or any legislative provision, of which he is aware and which he believes to be immediately in point, whether it be for or against his contention.

137. If at any time before judgment is delivered in a civil case, a barrister is informed by his lay client that he has committed perjury or has otherwise been guilty of fraud upon the Court, the barrister may not so inform the Court without his client's consent. He may not, however, take any further part in the case unless his client authorises him to inform the Court of the perjured statement or other fraudulent conduct and he has so informed the Court.

138. In cross-examination which goes to a matter in issue, a barrister may put questions suggesting fraud, misconduct or the commission of a crime if he is satisfied that the matters suggested are part of his client's case and he has no reason to believe that they are only put forward for the purpose of impugning the witness's character.

139.

(a) Questions which affect the credibility of a witness by attacking his character, but which are otherwise not relevant to the actual inquiry, may not be put in cross-examination unless there are reasonable grounds to support the imputation conveyed by the questions.
(b) A barrister may regard instructions from the person instructing him that the imputation is well-founded as reasonable grounds to support an imputation conveyed by such questions; but he may not rely on a statement from any other person unless he has ascertained so far as is practicable that the person can give satisfactory reasons for his statement.

139A. If before or during a case, a document belonging to the other side should come into the possession of Counsel, he should if he intends to make any use of it inform his opponent that it has come into his possession. This information should be communicated in sufficient time for the opponent to raise an objection to the use of the document.

Dress in Court

140. Notes for guidance on dress in Court, which have been issued by the Bar Council with the concurrence of the Chief Justice, are set out in Annex 11.

Conferences and Consultations

141. It is part of the duty of a barrister briefed for a hearing to be available if it is both necessary and practicable for a conference on a day prior to the hearing and for so long as may be required properly to discuss matters with the lay client. If the person instructing him in the matter does not arrange such a conference then it is the duty of a barrister to make himself available for such a conference on the hearing date at the place of hearing.

Attendance of Solicitors or their Representatives in Court

142.

(a) Subject to paragraphs 50, 142A, 143 and 144, a barrister may not appear in Court, or discuss a case or take instructions from or give advice to, his lay client unless the person instructing him or his representative is present. (Circular No. 85/95) 
(b) Subject to paragraphs 50, 142A, 143 and 144, a barrister may, if necessary, interview his lay client's potential witnesses, and discuss the case or clarify matters with them, provided that the person instructing him or his representative is present. (Circular No. 85/95)
(c) Different considerations apply to prosecution Counsel and general guidance is set out in Annex 12.

142A. Provided that he is satisfied that the interests of the lay client and the interests of justice will not be prejudiced (as where the barrister reasonably takes the view that it will not be necessary in the course of a Court hearing to take instructions from or otherwise seek the assistance of the solicitor or person instructing the barrister), a barrister may agree with the solicitor or the person instructing him that the attendance in Court of the solicitor or the instructing person or of their representatives may be dispensed with for all or part of any hearing. It is solely the responsibility of the barrister to decide whether and to what extent the attendance in Court of his professional client or his professional client's representative may be dispensed with. (Circular No. 85/95)

143. Notwithstanding that neither the solicitor nor the person instructing the barrister nor their representatives are present:-

(1) if the attendance of the solicitor or the person instructing the barrister or of their representatives has been dispensed with pursuant to paragraph 142A; or, (Circular No. 85/95) 
(2) if Counsel arrives at Court for a case in which he has been instructed by a person authorised to instruct him in the matter but neither such person nor his representative is present, and if there are no other grounds on which to request an adjournment and no practicable alternative, (Circular No. 85/95)

a barrister may:-

(a) conduct the case on behalf of the lay client, and
(b) exceptionally, interview supporting witnesses and take proofs of evidence if these are not already available in which case he should inform his opponent.

144. In a criminal case or in matters where the lay client is detained pursuant to the provisions of the Immigration Ordinance, a barrister may interview the lay client although the person instructing him in the matter or his representative is unable to be present, if such person has given his approval to the interview taking place or the circumstances make it necessary. (Circular No. 61/90)

145. Save with the consent of Counsel for the opposing side or of the Court, a barrister may not communicate directly or indirectly with a witness, whether or not the witness is his client, once that witness has begun to give evidence until his evidence has been concluded. Duties When Defending a Person Accused of a Crime 146. When defending a client on a charge of crime, a barrister must endeavour to protect his client from being convicted except by a competent tribunal and upon legal evidence sufficient to support a conviction for the offence with which his client is charged. A barrister must not provide or devise facts which will assist in advancing his client's case.

146. When defending a client on a charge of crime, a barrister must endeavour to protect his clients from being convicted except by a competent tribunal and upon legal evidence sufficient to support a conviction for the offence with which his client is charged.  A barrister must not provide or devise facts which will assist in advancing his client's case.

147. A barrister may not in cross-examination attribute to another person the crime with which his client is charged unless he can properly do so in accordance with paragraph 138; or in any other part of the trial, unless there are facts or circumstances which reasonably suggest the possibility that the crime may have been committed by the person to whom the guilt is imputed.

148. Subject to paragraphs 21 and 56-63 of this Code, a barrister is under a duty to defend any person on whose behalf he is instructed on a criminal charge irrespective of any belief or opinion which he may have formed as to the guilt or innocence of that person.

149. A barrister to whom a confession of guilt has been made by his client must observe the following rules:

(a) If the confession is made before the proceedings have started he may continue to act only if the plea is to be one of guilty, or if the plea is to be one of not guilty he acts in accordance with the rules set out in Annex 13 which impose very strict limitations on the conduct of the defence. In the latter case he must explain his position to the client and his instructing solicitor. If the barrister is instructed to act otherwise than in conformity with this rule he should return his brief.
(b) If the confession is made during the proceedings or in such circumstances that he cannot withdraw without compromising the position of his client, he should continue to act and to do all he honourably can for him; but this situation similarly imposes very strict limitations on the conduct of the defence; and the barrister may not set up an affirmative case inconsistent with the confession by, for example, asserting or suggesting that some other person committed the offence charged or calling evidence in support of an alibi.

150.

(a) It is the duty of defending Counsel to advise his client generally about his plea to the charge. It should be made clear that whether he pleads "not guilty" or "guilty", the client has the responsibility for and complete freedom of choice in his plea. For the purposes of giving proper advice, Counsel is entitled to refer to all aspects of the case and where appropriate he may advise his client in strong terms that he is unlikely to escape conviction and that a plea of guilty is generally regarded by the Court as a mitigating factor.
(b) Where a defendant tells his Counsel that he did not commit the offence with which he is charged but nonetheless insists on pleading guilty to it for reasons of his own, Counsel must continue to represent him, but only after he has advised what the consequences will be and that what can be submitted by Counsel in mitigation will have to be on the basis that the client is guilty.

151.

(a) Subject to paragraph 56A, it is the duty of defending Counsel to ensure that an accused person is never left unrepresented at any stage of his trial. (Circular No. 85/95) 
(b) Where an accused is represented by two Counsel neither may absent himself other than for a purely temporary period except for good reason and then only when the consent of the solicitor or his representative and the client is obtained.
(c) Where an accused is represented by only one Counsel, that Counsel must normally be present throughout the trial and may only absent himself in exceptional circumstances which he could not reasonably have been expected to foresee and provided (1) he obtains the consent of the solicitor or his representative and his client and (2) a competent deputy takes his place. A deputy is not to be regarded as competent unless he is well informed about the case and able to deal with any question which might reasonably be expected to arise.
(d) Sub-paragraphs (a), (b) and (c) above are subject to the following modification in respect of lengthy trials involving numerous defendants. Where, after the conclusion of the opening speech by the prosecution, defending Counsel is satisfied that during a specific part of the trial there is no serious possibility that events will occur which relate to his client, he may, with the consent of (1) the person instructing him in the matter or his representative and (2) his client, absent himself for that part of the trial. He should also inform the judge. In this event it is his duty (1) to arrange for other defending Counsel to guard the interests of his client; (2) to keep himself informed throughout of the progress of the trial and in of any development which could affect his client; and (3) not to accept other commitments which would render it impracticable for him to make himself available at reasonable notice if the interests of his client so require.

152.

(a) If during the course of a criminal trial and prior to final sentence the defendant voluntarily absconds and the person instructing defending Counsel withdraws from the case, then Counsel too must withdraw.
(b) If the trial judge requests Counsel to remain to assist the Court Counsel has an absolute discretion whether he does so. If he does, he must act on the basis that his instructions are withdrawn and he will not be entitled to use any material contained in his brief save that part already established in evidence before the Court. He should request the trial judge to instruct the jury that this is the basis on which he is prepared to assist the Court.
(c) If, for any reason, the person instructing him in the matter does not withdraw from the case, Counsel retains an absolute discretion whether to continue to act. If he does continue, he should conduct the case as if his client were still present in Court, but had decided not to give evidence (on which see paragraph 156(b) below) and on the basis of the instructions he has received. He will be free to use any material contained in his brief and may cross-examine witnesses called for the prosecution and call witnesses for the defence.

153. A barrister may appear for more than one defendant in a criminal trial provided he satisfies himself there is no conflict of interest.

154. If some procedural irregularity comes to the knowledge of Defence Counsel before the verdict is returned, he should inform the Court as soon as practicable and should not wait with a view to raising the matter later on appeal. Defence Counsel is not under any duty to draw matters of fact or law to the attention of the Court at the conclusion of the summing-up, but he may do so if he believes it would be to the advantage of his client.

155. Defence Counsel has no duty to advise his client to disclose a previous conviction. If the Court has been led by the prosecution to believe that an accused has no previous convictions, Defence Counsel is under no duty to disclose facts to the contrary which are known to him, nor correct any information given by the prosecution if such disclosure or correction would be to his client's detriment; but Defence Counsel must take care not to lend himself to any assertion that his client has no convictions, or to ask a prosecution witness whether there are previous convictions against his client, in the hope that he will receive a negative answer.

156.

(a) Every accused person has the right to decide whether to give evidence in his own defence. A barrister may properly advise his client upon this but it is the accused himself who must make the decision.
(b) If an accused person instructs his Counsel that he is not guilty of the offences with which he is charged but decides not to give evidence himself, it is the duty of his Counsel to put his defence before the Court and, if necessary, to make positive suggestions to witnesses.

157. Defence Counsel should not, in a plea in mitigation, make any allegation which is merely scandalous or calculated to vilify or insult any person. In any case, the naming in open court of third parties, whose character would thereby be impugned, should if possible be avoided. Where necessary, names, addresses or other such details should be written down and handed in to the Court.

158. In normal circumstances, it is the duty of Defence Counsel to see his lay client after conviction and sentence, or if he is unable to do this, ensure that the person instructing him in the matter or his representative does so.

Duties When Prosecuting a Person Accused of a Crime

159. It is not the duty of Prosecuting Counsel to obtain a conviction by all means at his command but rather to lay before the jury fairly and impartially the whole of the facts which comprise the case for the prosecution and to see that the jury are properly instructed in the law applicable to those facts.

160.

(a) Where Prosecuting Counsel has in his possession statements from persons whom he does not propose to call as witnesses, he should regard it as normal practice to show such statements to the Defence. Where, however, the Defence already know of the existence, identity and whereabouts of any such person and are in a position to call him (as, for example, when a notice of alibi has been served, or when such person is married to a Defendant) and in other exceptional circumstances, then Prosecuting Counsel may, in his discretion, refrain from showing the statement to the Defence.
(b) Where Prosecuting Counsel has in his possession a statement from a prosecution witness which differs in a material respect from the evidence being given by the witness or his committal statements, such a statement should be disclosed to the defence.
(c) Where Prosecuting Counsel appears in the Magistrates Court and knows that a copy of the statement of any witness he proposes to call to give evidence has not been served on the Defence, he should regard it as normal practice to show the statement to the Defending advocate.

161. A barrister prosecuting an accused person should be present throughout the trial, including the summing-up and the return of the jury. He may not absent himself without leave of the Court, but if two or more barristers appear for the prosecution, the attendance of one is sufficient.

162. It is the duty of Prosecuting Counsel to assist the Court at the conclusion of the summing-up by drawing attention to any apparent errors or omissions of fact or law which, in his opinion, ought to be corrected.

163. Prosecuting Counsel should not attempt by advocacy to influence the Court in regard to sentence. If, however, an accused person is unrepresented, it is proper for Prosecuting Counsel to inform the Court of any mitigating circumstances as to which he is instructed.

163A. When a barrister instructed and acting for the prosecution or the defence of an accused has in his possession a copy of a video recording of a child witness which may be admitted as evidence in a criminal trial in accordance with s.79C Criminal Procedure Ordinance, Cap 221 he must have regard to the following duties and obligations:

(a) Upon receipt of the recording, a written record of the date and time and from whom the recording was received must be made and a receipt must be given.
(b) The recording and its contents must be used only for the proper preparation of the prosecution or defence case or of an appeal against conviction and/or sentence and/or review, as the case may be, and the barrister must not make or permit any disclosure of the recording or its contents to any person except when, in his opinion, it is in the interests of his proper preparation of that case.
(c) The barrister must not make or permit any other person to make a copy of the recording, nor release the recording to the accused, and must ensure that:

(i) when not in transit or in use, the recording is always kept in a secure place, and;
(ii) when in transit, the recording is kept safe and secure at all times and is not left unattended, especially in vehicles or otherwise.

(d) Proper preparation of the case may involve viewing the recording in the presence of the accused. If this is the case, viewing should be done:

(i) if the accused is in custody, only in the prison or other custodial institution where he is being held, in the presence of the barrister and/or his instructing solicitor;
(ii) if the accused is on bail, at the solicitor's office or in Counsel's chambers or elsewhere in the presence of the barrister and/or his instructing solicitor.

(e) The recording must be returned to the solicitor as soon as practicable after the conclusion of the barrister's role in the case. A written record of the date and time despatched and to whom the recording was delivered for despatch must be made. (Circular No. 28/96)

[The next paragraph number is 170.]

Overseas Work and Foreign Lawyers (Paragraph No.s 170-174)

170. A practising barrister may not, save insofar as the Overseas Practice Rules (Annex 14) permit or with the permission of the Bar Council, accept instructions to undertake any matter in any Commonwealth or Common Law country except through a member of the legal profession entitled in that country to give such instructions or through a solicitor of the High Court of Hong Kong. The same rule applies in any other country unless the barrister is a member of the Bar of the country concerned.

171.

(a) An overseas barrister must first be admitted to the Hong Kong Bar before he is entitled to perform the work of a barrister in Hong Kong.
(b) An overseas barrister called to the Hong Kong Bar for the purpose of any particular case or cases under s.27(2) of the Legal Practitioners Ordinance, Cap 159 of the Laws of Hong Kong, may not while in Hong Kong accept instructions or conduct any litigation otherwise than in relation to the case or cases for which he has been admitted.
(c) An overseas barrister admitted as aforesaid shall not accept any instructions or conduct any litigation in relation to the case or cases for which he is admitted unless a Hong Kong barrister has been instructed with him.

172. The rules for overseas practice, including practice in Hong Kong for which special provision is required because of its overseas connection, are set out in Annex 14, and shall apply where appropriate.

[The next paragraph number is 174.]

174. A practising barrister who is also qualified in some other system of law and practises concurrently in Hong Kong must observe the rules set out in Annex 16.

[The next paragraph number is 180.]

Employed and Non-Practising Barristers General Principles (Paragraph No.s 180-183)

180. An employed barrister is a barrister who is engaged to provide legal advice or services for his employer under a contract of employment. A barrister who is neither a practising barrister nor an employed barrister is a non-practising barrister. The provisions of this Code apply to employed and non-practising barristers except where they expressly or by necessary implication apply to practising barristers only.

181. An employed or non-practising barrister may not without the permission of the Bar Council act as a Judge's clerk or barrister's clerk, or in any capacity whereby directly or indirectly he supplies legal advice or services to the public or a section of the public save insofar as is permitted by the rules in force in the country where being resident he so acts. This rule is not infringed by a barrister who is an employee of a firm or company and who supplies legal advice or services to his employer, provided that:

(a) he does not himself supply legal advice or services to the public or a section of the public, and
(b) the firm or company is not wholly or in part a device whereby the barrister himself (with or without others) is intended directly or indirectly to supply legal advice or services to the public or a section of the public. Lecturing, teaching and the writing of articles in newspaper or journals shall not be considered the supply of legal advice or services to the public.

182. Neither an employed barrister nor a non-practising barrister may appear before a Court as Counsel unless he is employed by the Government and is empowered to do so by law.

183. Neither an employed barrister nor a non-practising barrister may instruct a practising barrister direct without the intervention of a solicitor, save that an employed barrister may do so if he is employed by the Government and is empowered to do so by law.

Compulsory Professional Indemnity Insurance (Circular No. 66/95) (Paragraph No.s 184-187)

184. Subject to any exemptions which may be granted by the Bar Council as hereinafter provided, all barristers who hold and/or intend to apply for Practising Certificates, including Pupils in limited practice:- (Circular No. 060/03)

(1) must be insured under the current Master Policy for professional indemnity insurance effected by the Bar Association for and on behalf of its members ("the Master Policy"); and, (Circular No. 060/03) 
(2) must punctually pay the premiums for such insurance:-

(a) at the rates and in the amounts determined by the Bar Council from time to time;
(b) to the insurance brokers specified by the Bar Council ("the brokers"); and
(c) at or by the time or times specified by the Bar Council.

185. It shall be a condition for the issue of Practising Certificates that barristers applying for the same shall, on making such application, produce to the Bar Association:- (Circular No. 060/03)

(1) documentary evidence, in a form approved by the Bar Council and issued by the brokers, of having duly effected insurance under the Master Policy for the period to be covered by the Practising Certificate so applied for; or, (Circular No. 060/03) 
(2) a written exemption from being so insured issued by the Bar Council.

186. The Bar Council shall have power, with or without the imposition of conditions (as to the provision of any undertakings or otherwise) to exempt a barrister admitted under section 27(4) of the Legal Practitioners Ordinance (Cap. 159) from effecting such insurance in such circumstances as the Bar Council may, at its discretion, consider appropriate. (Circular No. 67/95; 060/03)

187. [Deleted] (Circular No. 060/03)

Annex 4 - (Paragraph 23) List of Approved Supplementary Occupations

(Circular No.009/09)

The following supplementary occupations have been approved as compatible with practice at the Bar:-

(1) Legal

(a) Offices

(i) Coroner
(ii) Third Party Neutral in alternative dispute resolution procedures, including Mediator, Adjudicator, Arbitrator or Umpire (Circular No. 48/98) 
(iii) Member of a board of review, board of inquiry, tribunal, panel or committee established under any statutory or administrative powers (Circular No. 15/99)

(b) Occupations

(i) Examining newspapers, periodicals, books, scripts and other publications for libel, breach of copyright, contempt of court and the like
(ii) Advising producers of plays and films on such matters
(iii) Running a private law tutorial school
(iv) Acting as a trustee for remuneration provided for in the settlement
(v) Acting as unpaid or honorary legal adviser to any charitable, benevolent or philanthropic institution, including a company that has been established for such purpose
(Circular No. 15/99; Circular No.009/09)

(2) Legal or Non-Legal

(a) Writing, editing, and reviewing books and periodicals
(b) Journalism
(c) Broadcasting
(d) Member of a non-trading body established under any statutory or administrative powers
(Circular No. 15/99; Circular No.009/09)

(3) Non-Legal

(a) Lecturing
(b) Business

(i) Non-executive director of a company (whether public or private) or chairman, director, secretary of a company not actively engaged in trade or business
(ii) Chairman, secretary, officer or member of the board of a co-operative society, a management committee of the incorporated owners of a building
(iii) Landlord of rented accommodation

(c) Charities Officer, trustee or governor of any charitable, benevolent or philanthropic institution, and where a company has been established for such purpose, chairman, director or secretary of such company
(Circular No. 15/99; Circular No.009/09)

Annex 4A - (Paragraph 23) List of Approved Occupations

The following occupations are occupations which a practising barrister may engage in, irrespective of whether, by engaging in any of those occupations, practising as a barrister is or remains the primary occupation of the barrister:

(1) Member of Executive Council;
(2) Member of Legislative Council;
(3) Member of any District Council;
(4) Member of the Heung Yee Kuk or any rural committee;
(5) Acting as a “Village Representative” as defined under the Village Representative Election Ordinance (Cap 576);
(6) Lecturing or teaching in law, or administering any Law Faculty or Law School or any departments thereof of any university, whether in Hong Kong or elsewhere;
(7) Practising as a legal practitioner (of whatever description) in another jurisdiction;
(8) Law reporting;
(9) Caring for immediate family members.

(Circular No.009/09)

Annex 5 - (Paragraph 30) Duties of and Guidelines for Pupil Masters and Pupils

Pupil Masters

I. Barristers who are qualified under Paragraph 29(1)(a) of the Code of Conduct to take on Pupils are generally encouraged to do so. (Circular No. 052/03) 
II. The duties of a Pupil Master are as set out in this Annex or in such other rules or guidelines relating to pupillage as may be approved from time to time by the Bar Council.
III. The duties below apply to Pupil Masters in the Department of Justice except where they expressly or by necessary implication apply to barristers in private practice only.
IV. The general obligations and functions of a Pupil Master are as follows:-

A. He should give specific and detailed teaching instruction in the drafting of pleadings and other documents.
B. He should ensure that the Pupil is well grounded in the rules of conduct and etiquette of the Bar and follows such guidelines for Pupils as may be approved from time to time by the Bar Council.
C. He should require his Pupil to read his papers and draft pleadings and other documents, including opinions. He should then discuss the drafts personally with the Pupil.
D. He should require his Pupils to accompany him to court on sufficiently frequent occasions and to take proper notes of the proceedings during those occasions. He should discuss the proceedings with his Pupil afterwards.
E. He should require his Pupil to attend conferences and to do the necessary preparation to conduct such conferences.
F. In requiring his Pupil to do the work mentioned in sub-paragraphs C, D or E above, the Pupil Master should ensure that his Pupil has the opportunity to do such work and gain such experience as is appropriate for a person commencing practice in the type of work done by the Pupil Master.
G. If the opportunity mentioned in sub-paragraph
F above may also be obtained from other members of chambers, the Pupil Master may occasionally arrange for his Pupil to see the work of such other members of chambers.
H. He should take all reasonable steps to enable his Pupil to see the work done by junior members of chambers so that his Pupil may have an idea of the type of work which a barrister would do when commencing practice.
I. The Pupil Master should endeavour to provide the Pupil with an opportunity to see a variety of Court-related work and he may arrange for the Pupil from time to time to accompany other members of his chambers or other barristers to other Courts.
J. He should encourage a relationship between himself, his chambers, his colleagues and his Pupil whereby his Pupil is encouraged to receive information on matters relating to practice and etiquette.
K. He should encourage his Pupil to attend such activities as the Bar Association may from time to time arrange including its Advanced Legal Education programme. (Circular No. 052/03) 
L. Although a Pupil has no right or expectation to receive remuneration from his Pupil Master, a Pupil Master should remunerate his Pupil where the Pupil has done work of value to him at any stage of his pupillage.
M. During the period of limited practice of the Pupil, a Pupil Master should:-

1. take a direct interest in and monitor all work his Pupil does on his own and, in particular, he should, in relation to all Court appearances by his Pupil, give assistance before his Pupil goes to Court and discuss the Pupil's performance afterwards;
2. take all reasonable steps to ensure that his Pupil does not do so much work of his own that his pupillage is impaired; and,
3. ensure that the Pupil does not accept briefs or instructions which are beyond his Pupil's capacity. (Circular No. 052/03)

N. At the end of the relevant period of pupillage, he must satisfy himself before issuing a certificate mentioned in s.10(4)(a) of the Barristers (Qualification for Admission and Pupillage) Rules that his Pupil has served his pupillage with diligence and that he is a fit and suitable person to practise as a barrister in Hong Kong. He must have serious regard to whether and how the Pupil has performed and complied with such minimum pupillage requirements as the Bar Council may recommend from time to time including requirements as to completion of the Bar's Advanced Legal Education programme. If he is not so satisfied, it is his duty not to provide such certificate. (Circular No. 052/03)

Pupils

1. A Pupil should apprise himself of and comply with the provisions of the Legal Practitioners Ordinance and associated Rules relating to admission to the Bar and pupillage.
2. He should treat his pupillage as a training period during which he has the following general obligations:-

(1) He is bound by the Code of Conduct and such other rules or guidelines as may be approved from time to time by the Bar Council. (Circular No. 052/03)
(2) He should acquaint himself generally with the etiquette of the Bar.
(3) He should maintain a positive attitude towards his pupillage, be conscientious in receiving the instruction given by his Pupil Master and apply himself thereto full time with all care and attention as if his Pupil Master's work were his own.
(4) He should have the initiative to ask for instruction from his Pupil Master and, where appropriate, to seek the consent of his Pupil Master to see the work of or go to Court with other members, in particular junior members, of his Pupil Master's chambers.
(5) He should have the initiative to discuss with and receive information from his Pupil Master on all matters relating to practice and etiquette at the Bar.
(6) He should seek guidance from his Pupil Master and, where appropriate, other members of his Pupil Master's chambers as to the type of work which he is likely to do when he commences practice and as to how such work ought to be done.
(7) While his Pupil Master should remunerate him for work of value, a Pupil should not expect to be so remunerated at any stage of his pupillage training.
(8) He should preserve the confidentiality of the affairs of his Pupil Master, his Pupil Master's clients or the clients of any members of his Pupil Master's chambers as set out in paragraph 116 of the Code of Conduct.
(9) Without the prior approval of his Pupil Master, he should not render professional advice to or do work for his Pupil Master's clients on behalf of his Pupil Master at any stage of his pupillage.
(10) In the course of his pupillage, he should ensure that he performs with diligence such minimum activities as the Bar Council may from time to time require as part of pupillage.
(11) Unless exempted by the Bar Council, he must attend and complete the Bar's Advanced Legal Education programme. (Circular No. 052/03) 
(12) During the period of limited practice, he should:-

(a) only take on such work as his Pupil Master allows him to, since there is no entitlement to practise as such;
(b) where his Pupil Master has allowed him to take on a case, consult and discuss with his Pupil Master in relation to all aspects of the case; and,
(c) ensure that he does not do so much work of his own so that his pupillage training is impaired. (Circular No.052/03)

3. The spirit of these guidelines apply equally to a pupil acting as a Judge's Marshall.

APPENDIX

GUIDELINES FOR A JUDGE TAKING ON A PUPIL AS MARSHALL

The general obligations of a Judge taking on a Pupil as Marshall are as follows:-

1. He should ensure that the Pupil is well-grounded in the rules of conduct and etiquette of the Court.
2. He should require the Pupil to read his papers and do such research, prepare such notes or draft such documents as may assist him in his work as Judge.
3. He should require the Pupil to attend at Court on sufficiently frequent occasions and to take proper notes of the proceedings during those occasions.
4. He should take a direct interest in and monitor all work which the Pupil does as Marshall.
5. He should afford the Pupil with an opportunity to discuss as many as possible of the cases handled by him during the Pupil's period of service as a Marshall.
6. At the end of the relevant period of service as a Marshall:-

(1) he should satisfy himself that the Pupil has served as Marshall with diligence and is a suitable person to practise as a barrister in Hong Kong; and,
(2) he should inform the Pupil and the Bar Council of his assessment.
(Circular No. 064/04)

SUGGESTED MINIMUM PUPILLAGE REQUIREMENTS

The Pupil and Pupil Master should take reasonable steps to ensure that the Pupil is exposed to work of sufficient quantity and diversity during his pupillage. Save in exceptional circumstances:

(1) a Pupil is normally expected to spend at least 3 months of the period of pupillage on criminal work and 3 months on civil work; and
(2) such work should include, but not be limited to, the following:- (Circular No. 052/03)

Civil Law

Court Attendance:-

1. Trials

2 District Court or Court of First Instance trials.

2. Applications

2 interlocutory summonses in the District Court, Court of First Instance or Court of Appeal.

3. Appeal

1 appeal before a 3-man bench of the Court of Appeal.

Paper work:-

1. 2 Statements of Claim.
2. 2 Defences.
3. 1 Reply.
4. 2 Summonses and supporting Affidavits.
5. 1 Advice.
6. 1 Notice of Appeal.
7. 1 Skeleton Argument.

Conferences:-
Attendance at numerous conferences.

Criminal Law

Court Attendance:-

1. Trials

(1) 2 trials in the Magistrates Court (1 for the prosecution and 1 for the defence).
(2) 1 full trial in the District Court and Court of First Instance respectively, preferably:-

(a) 1 trial for the prosecution and 1 for the defence; and,
(b) inclusive of a voir dire.

(3) 1 pre-trial review in the District Court or Court of First Instance.
(4) 1 plea day for the Duty Lawyer Service.

2. Applications

1 substantive application before a Judge of the District Court or Court of First Instance.

3. Appeal

(1) 1 Magistracy Appeal before a Judge of the Court of First Instance.
(2) 1 criminal appeal hearing before the Court of Appeal.

Paper work:-

1. Drafting Notice(s) of Appeal against Conviction and Sentence, including Perfected Grounds.
2. Drafting written submissions for criminal appeal.

Legal visits:-

If possible, 1 visit to a detention centre, prison, etc.

Conferences:-

Attendance at numerous conferences. Pupils and Pupil Masters are expected to seriously and conscientiously fill in the Pupils' logbooks. Pupillage logbooks which are considered to contain inadequate information about the nature and quality of the Pupils' work during pupillage will not be accepted.
(Circular No. 052/03)

 

 Date

 Nature
 of Case

 Length

 Argued or
 Settled

 Nature of Pupil's 
 Involvement

 Pupil Master's
 Comments on Pupil's  Involvement

 Civil Law

 Court Attendances

 Trials

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Interlocutory Applications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Appeals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Others

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Paper Work

 Statements of Claim

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Defences

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Replies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Summonses and 
 Supporting Affidavits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Advices

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Notices of Appeal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Skeleton Arguments

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Others

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Criminal Law

 Court Attendances

 Trials

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Applications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Appeals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Others

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Paper Work

 Notices of Appeal

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Written Submissions

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Others

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Visits to detention centres, prisons, etc.

 

Annex 6 (Paragraph 51) Rules for the Acceptance of Instructions by Senior Counsel (Circular No. 85/95)

1. There is no objection to a barrister recommending another barrister as his leader or junior if, but only if, he is asked for his opinion.

2. Subject to paragraph 3(b) below, a Senior Counsel may appear in any court of law or tribunal (including disciplinary hearings and arbitration proceedings) without a junior.

3. A Senior Counsel:-

(a) is not obliged to accept a brief to appear alone or instructions to settle alone any document of a kind generally settled only by or in conjunction with a junior; and,
(b) should not act without a junior if he considers that the interests of the lay client require that a junior should also be instructed.

4. Where he has agreed to appear or accept instructions without a junior, a Senior Counsel may draft pleadings or other documents in connection with such instructions.

5. Where both a Senior Counsel and junior Counsel are instructed, the Senior Counsel should not normally advise except in consultation with the junior. Where both a Senior Counsel and junior Counsel have been instructed but no papers have yet been delivered to junior Counsel, a Senior Counsel may advise in conference or give a written opinion without the assistance of a junior. A Senior Counsel should not normally draft or settle a petition or a case in proceedings before the Court of Final Appeal without the assistance of a junior.

6. A Senior Counsel who finds, on receiving a brief or instructions to appear without a junior, that acceptance of the papers would amount to his replacing a junior barrister who has previously been instructed in the same matter should inform that junior barrister that the papers have been delivered to him, save where the brief or instructions have been returned by that junior barrister or the person instructing the Senior Counsel in the matter has already informed that junior barrister of the termination of his service or there has been no reasonable opportunity to inform that junior barrister before the hearing.

7. It is contrary to professional etiquette for a Senior Counsel, if in practice at the Bar, to accept a permanent appointment as Counsel to a Government Department which necessarily involves his doing a junior's work.

8.

(a) A Senior Counsel should normally be willing at any time before the first anniversary of his appointment as a Senior Counsel:

(i) to settle, amend, re-settle or otherwise complete as a junior, any document relating to non-contentious matter which he was originally instructed to settle before his appointment;
(ii) to settle pleadings and other documents, appear at the trial or at any hearing preceding the trial and do any other ordinary work of a junior in any proceeding (whether civil or criminal) in regard to which he was instructed before his appointment.

(b) A Senior Counsel may at his discretion continue to act as a junior (including settling pleadings, notices of appeal and other documents, appearing at any hearing [whether original or appellate] and doing any other ordinary work of a junior) without limit of time:-

(i) in a criminal case, if he was instructed in the case (whether for the Prosecution or the Defence) before his appointment as a Senior Counsel;
(ii) in a civil suit, if he was instructed therein before his appointment as a Senior Counsel and before the first anniversary of his appointment appeared as a junior at the trial or in an appeal therein.

(c) If a junior Counsel takes silk and continues in a case as a junior, he must take a junior's fee.

9. Where a Senior Counsel desires to recognise the services of a junior Counsel who has appeared with him, the traditional gift of the red bag should be adhered to.

10. Applicants for Silk are encouraged to give notice to those juniors who are senior to them of their intention to apply.

11. The "two-thirds rule" has been abolished in Hong Kong. Where two or more Counsel are instructed in the same case, the junior Counsel should be paid an appropriate fee.

12. A Senior Counsel from another common law jurisdiction who seeks admission for the purpose of a particular case or cases under s.27(2) of the Legal Practitioners Ordinance (Cap.159) should, if admitted for such purpose, be instructed with a junior.

Annex 7 (Paragraph 58 and 60) Conflict of Interest - Connection with Client

The following are examples of the application of paragraphs 58 and 60 of the Code of Conduct:

(1) Membership of or connection with various bodies

Member of the Executive or Legislative Council

Companies

(a) A barrister who is a director or the secretary of any company should not accept a brief for the company or, in a professional capacity, advise or settle documents for the company.
(b) A barrister who has been but has ceased to be a director or the secretary of any company should not act professionally, whether for the company or any other person, in any matter connected with or arising out of affairs relating to that company which were current while he was a director or the secretary.
(c) A barrister who has professionally advised a client about his position as a director or shareholder of a company ought not thereafter to accept a directorship of that company with a view either to assisting in the investigation of the company's affairs or advising the company on matters of law affecting its shareholders; or to accept a directorship as the nominee of the client on his retirement, in order to watch his interest.
(d) On the other hand, a barrister may, but is not obliged to, accept a brief to appear at a meeting of the shareholders of a company in order either to support the policy of the Board or to present the views of a group of shareholders, and may take a transfer of a share or shares of the company to enable him so to appear, provided he explains to the meeting that he appears as a paid advocate and is not necessarily presenting his own views as a shareholder.
(e) There is equally no objection to a barrister, in his private capacity and not professionally, serving on a shareholder's committee of inspection or otherwise assisting or acting with the liquidator in the winding-up of a company of which he is a member.
Professional Organisations
(f) A barrister who is an honorary member of a professional organisation or an ordinary member of a learned society or association concerned with the study of legal or medico-legal problems, ought not to act professionally for or against the organisation, society or association without the consent of the Bar Council. If he is a member of the Executive Committee or governing body of such a society or association he should not act professionally for or against it in any circumstances.

(2) Deputations
A barrister who accepts a brief to speak for a deputation ought to make it clear at the outset of the proceedings that he is appearing as Counsel and not as a member of the deputation, and he ought to abide by the decision of the authority receiving the deputation as to whether he can be heard as Counsel or not.

(3) Taxation
It is undesirable that Counsel should, without the express consent of the lay client, appear for the solicitor on the taxation between the solicitor and the client of the costs of a litigation in which the Counsel was retained and acted for the client.

Annex 8 (Paragraph 59) Conflict of Interest - Connection with Court or Tribunal

The following are examples of the application of paragraph 59 of the Code of Conduct:-

Former Judges

(1) The Bar Council does not approve as a matter of principle of former Judges in the Court of Final Appeal, High Court or the District Court returning to practice at the Bar in any capacity.

Appearance before Relatives

(2) It is not considered improper for a barrister to appear before his parents or near relative in the Court of First Instance, Court of Appeal, or the Court of Final Appeal. But a barrister should not appear before his or her spouse except in the Court of Final Appeal.

Annex 9 (Paragraph 101) Chambers - Notice of Change of Address etc.

Notice to solicitors, clients

1. When a practising barrister changes his professional address, or starts to practise at an additional address, he may send to such persons authorised to instruct him as are his clients notice of the change of his professional and E-mail address, and telephone, telex and facsimile numbers. (In this connection, "clients" means regular clients only and not every person authorised to instruct him from whom the barrister may have at any time received instructions.)

2. When a barrister returns to practice, he may send a similar notice to his former clients, that is, persons authorised to instruct him who were his regular clients when he ceased to practise.

Annex 10 (Paragraph 115) Extract from the Legal Aid Regulations Cap.91, Regulation 12(7) & (8)

(7) Without prejudice to the right of solicitor or counsel to give up a case for good reason, any solicitor or counsel may give up an aided person case if, in his opinion, the aided person has required the proceedings to be conducted unreasonably so as to incur an unjustifiable expense to the Director or has required unreasonably that the proceedings be continued.

(8) Where any solicitor or counsel exercises the right to give up an aided person's case-

(a) under the provisions of paragraph (7); or
(b) on the ground that the aided person has wilfully failed to provide the information to be furnished by him or in furnishing such information has knowingly made a false representation,

the solicitor or counsel shall make a report to the Director of the circumstances in which that right was exercised.

Annex 11 (Paragraph 140) Notes for Guidance on Dress in Court

1. The following notes for guidance are applicable to both men and women barristers; and the Chief Justice has approved them:-

(1) The dress of barristers appearing in Court should be unobtrusive and compatible with the wearing of robes.
(2) Suits and dresses should be of dark colour. Dresses or blouses should be long-sleeved and high to the neck. Men should wear waistcoats (except in the summer months, when they are not expected to wear them). Shirts and blouses should be predominantly white or of other unemphatic appearance. Collars should be white and shoes black.
(3) Wigs should, as far as possible, cover the hair which should be drawn back from the face and forehead, and if long enough should be put up.
(4) No conspicuous jewellery or ornaments should be worn.
(5) Female barristers are allowed to wear decent and suitable black long trouser suits when appearing in Chambers and fully robed in open Court. (Circular No. 16/96)

Senior Counsel
2. The silk gown is the correct gown for Senior Counsel.

Annex 12 (Paragraph 142) Guidance for Prosecution Counsel on the Attendance of Witnesses at Conferences

It is recognised practice in Hong Kong that a barrister may, if necessary, interview his lay client's potential witnesses, provided that the person instructing him in the matter or his representative is present.
Different considerations apply to prosecution Counsel and the following general guidance is therefore given:

(i) Counsel for the prosecution is in overall charge of the conduct of the case and should therefore not regard himself as appearing for a party.
(ii) Counsel for the prosecution may see and confer with investigator witnesses in the case but only if they have discharged some supervisory responsibility in the investigation.
(iii) Counsel for the prosecution ought not to confer with investigators or receive factual instructions directly from them on particular aspects of evidence to be given by them about which there is known or reasonably may be anticipated to be dispute.

Annex 13 (Paragraph 149) Confessions of Guilt

In considering the duty of an advocate retained to defend a person charged with an offence who confesses to Counsel himself that he did commit the offence charged, it is essential to bear the following points clearly in mind:-

(1) that every punishable crime is a breach of the common or statute law committed by a person of sound mind and understanding;
(2) that the issue in a criminal trial is always whether the accused is guilty of the offence charged, never whether he is innocent;
(3) that the burden of proof rests on the prosecution.

Upon the clear appreciation of these points depends broadly the true conception of the duty of the advocate for the accused.

His duty is to protect his client as far as possible from being convicted except by a competent tribunal and upon legal evidence sufficient to support a conviction for the offence with which he is charged.

The ways in which this duty can be successfully performed with regard to the facts of a case are (a) by showing that the accused was irresponsible at the time of the commission of the offence charged by reason of insanity or want of criminal capacity, or (b) by satisfying the tribunal that the evidence for the prosecution is unworthy of credence, or, even if believed, is insufficient to justify a conviction for the offence charged, or (c) by setting up in answer an affirmative case.

It follows that the mere fact that a person charged with a crime has in the circumstances above mentioned made such a confession to his Counsel, is no bar to that advocate appearing or continuing to appear in his defence, nor indeed does such a confession release the advocate from his imperative duty to do all he honourably can do for his client.

But such a confession imposes very strict limitations on the conduct of the defence. An advocate "may not assert that which he knows to be a lie. He may not connive at, much less attempt to substantiate, a fraud."
While, therefore, it would be right to take any objection to the competency of the Court, to the form of the indictment, to the admissibility of any evidence, or to the sufficiency of the evidence admitted, it would be absolutely wrong to suggest that some other person had committed the offence charged, or to call any evidence, which he must know to be false having regard to the confession, such, for instance, as evidence in support of an alibi, which is intended to show that the accused could not have done or in fact had not done the act; that is to say, an advocate must not (whether by calling the accused or otherwise) set up an affirmative case inconsistent with the confession made to him.

A more difficult question is within what limits, in the case supposed, may an advocate attack the evidence for the prosecution either by cross-examination or in his speech to the tribunal charged with the decision of the facts. No clearer rule can be laid down than this, that he is entitled to test the evidence given by each individual witness, and to argue that the evidence taken as a whole is insufficient to amount to proof that the accused is guilty of the offence charged. Further than this he ought not to go.

The foregoing is based on the assumption that the accused has made a clear confession that he did "commit the offence charged," and does not profess to deal with the very difficult questions which may present themselves to Counsel when a series of inconsistent statements are made to him by the accused before or during the proceedings, nor does it deal with the questions which may arise where statements are made by the accused which point almost irresistibly to the conclusion that the accused is guilty but do not amount to a clear confession. Statements of this kind must hamper the defence, but the questions arising on them are not dealt with here. They can only be answered after careful consideration of the actual circumstances of the particular case.

Annex 14 (Paragraph 172) Overseas Practice Rules of the Bar

The object of these rules is to preserve the characteristics of practice at the Bar in Hong Kong with such variation only as may genuinely and reasonably be appropriate to enable the Bar in modern conditions to participate in "foreign work."

Subject to local law and to rules which national or local Bars may prescribe a barrister practising in Hong Kong may, without prejudice to any rules of conduct otherwise binding upon him, do any of the following:

(1) Accept instructions from any person qualified to practise and practising as a foreign lawyer where the following conditions are satisfied:

(a) The work is not in a matter in which proceedings by way of litigation or arbitration in Hong Kong have been instituted.
(b) The work does not involve the drafting of documents for the purpose of, or in connection with, the institution of litigation or arbitration in Hong Kong other than a letter before proceedings.
(c) The work does not involve the performance in Hong Kong of substantial administrative work not normally performed by a practising barrister in Hong Kong.
(d) The work is not conveyancing or work usually performed exclusively by solicitors.

Provided that, notwithstanding conditions 1(a) and 1(b) above, a practising barrister may accept instructions from any person qualified as practising as a foreign lawyer for professional work for the purpose of, or in connection with any international arbitration proceedings in Hong Kong. "International arbitration proceedings" mean any arbitration proceedings pursuant to an arbitration agreement to which an individual who is a national of, or habitually resident in, or a body corporate which is incorporated in, or whose central management control is exercised in, any territory other than Hong Kong, is a party.

(2) Accept instructions from any lay client:

(a) for professional work relating to matters essentially arising, taking place, or contemplated outside Hong Kong, which has to be substantially performed outside Hong Kong; or
(b) for professional work whether or not to be performed in Hong Kong for the purpose of or in connection with litigation or arbitration outside Hong Kong, which does not involve the performance in Hong Kong of substantial administrative work not normally performed by a practising barrister in Hong Kong.

(3) Accept instructions from a lay client where the lay client carries on business outside Hong Kong or usually lives outside Hong Kong ("overseas lay client") or from a lawyer or legal practitioner practising outside Hong Kong (Circular No. 070/02) and where the following conditions are satisfied:

(a) The instructions emanate from outside Hong Kong.
(b) The instructions are not in a matter in which the barrister was first instructed by a solicitor practising in Hong Kong.
(c) The work is not in a matter in which proceedings by way of litigation or arbitration in Hong Kong have been instituted.
(d) The work does not involve the drafting of documents for the purpose of, or in connection with, the institution of litigation or arbitration in Hong Kong other than a letter before proceedings.
(e) The work does not involve the performance in Hong Kong of substantial administrative work not normally performed by a practising barrister in Hong Kong.
(f) The work is not conveyancing or work usually performed exclusively by solicitors.

Provided that, notwithstanding conditions (3)(b), (3)(c) and (3)(d) above, a practising barrister may accept instructions from any overseas lay client or lawyer or legal practitioner practising outside Hong Kong for professional work for the purpose of, or in connection with any international arbitration proceedings (as defined in paragraph (1) above) in Hong Kong. (Circular No. 070/02)

(4) Negotiate fees for work done under 1, 2 or 3 above direct with the lawyer or the lay client as the case may be and if necessary take such steps as may be available to enforce payment.

(5) In relation to work falling within 1, 2 or 3 above accept (otherwise than as an employee) an annual fee or retainer, a fixed fee or a contingent fee and at his sole discretion agree any reduction in fees.

(6) Employ outside Hong Kong any person who is not a solicitor practising in Hong Kong.

(7) Carry on practice outside Hong Kong without the services of a clerk.

(8) If a Senior Counsel, draft documents with or without a junior in connection with work falling within 1, 2 or 3 above and in connection with proceedings in courts outside Hong Kong.

(9) If a Senior Counsel, appear in courts outside Hong Kong with or without a junior.

(10) Enter into any association (including partnership) with any lawyer for the purpose of sharing any office or services outside Hong Kong or doing, or sharing fees relating to, any work falling within 1, 2 or 3 above, provided that no such association shall be created or subsist with any solicitor practising in Hong Kong or with any firm of solicitors so practising.

(11) Describe or identify himself professionally outside Hong Kong as John Doe, Barrister or Richard Roe SC, Barrister as the case may be.

Annex 16 (Paragraph 174) Dual Qualification Rules

1. A practising barrister who is also qualified in some other system of law and practises concurrently in Hong Kong by virtue of that other qualification shall observe the rules of conduct applicable to a Hong Kong barrister (including where relevant the Overseas Practice Rules (Annex 14)) in the course of his Hong Kong practice.

2. A barrister may, as part of his foreign practice, give advice on Hong Kong law in circumstances where that advice is incidental and subsidiary to the conduct of his foreign practice in a particular case.

3. In Hong Kong:

(a) "Foreign practice" means advising on, or drafting documents to be governed by, that other system of law in which he is qualified and appearing before a tribunal whose constitution and procedure is governed by that system of law;
(b) Any other professional activity is Hong Kong practice, unless the Bar Council shall by prior dispensation have ruled that it may be considered foreign practice.

4. Whether any activity outside Hong Kong is Hong Kong practice or foreign practice depends on the circumstances of the particular case.

5. In Rule 3(a) "system of law", where the barrister is qualified in the law of one state or province of a federal constitution, includes the law of every other state or province and the federal law of that constitution.

Annex 18 (i) (Paragraph 127) Reproduction of Circular No. 6/81 issued by the Law Society of Hong Kong re “Payment of Counsel’s Fees” and “Marking of Counsel’s Diary”

Payment of Counsel's Fees

Counsel's fees must be paid or challenged promptly, and in any event within 2 months from the submission of Counsel's fee note. Failure to pay Counsel's fees within the time limit will, on complaint, be dealt with and investigated as an allegation of breach of conduct.

The Council has received complaints about late payment of Counsel's fees which some members place in a deposit account to earn interest. The Council cannot too strongly deplore such conduct which calls for disciplinary sanction.

Marking of Counsel's Diary

(a) The marking of Counsel's diary does not commit either Counsel or solicitor, and no fees are therefore payable on account of it.
(b) Counsel and solicitors should be encouraged to come to an express agreement relating to both the brief and refreshers and the manner in which such are payable.
(c) Counsel and solicitors should be encouraged to come to such a specific agreement even before Counsel's diary is obtained; but if this should prove to be impossible, then the sooner they come a specific agreement, the better it is for both.
(d) If after the marking of Counsel's diary, Counsel is approached by another solicitor wishing to brief him during the same period in question or part thereof, Counsel (who by that time has agreed his brief as well as refreshers) would be obliged to approach the 1st solicitor and he should specify terms as to the manner in which the agreed brief fee and refreshers should become payable. If the 1st solicitor or his client is not in agreement with such terms, the Counsel will be at liberty to accept the brief from the 2nd solicitor. In such event, the 1st solicitor need not pay Counsel anything in relation to the reserved dates. Provided that the above rule does not apply where:

(i) Counsel and solicitors have come to an express agreement relating to both the brief and refreshers and the manner in which they are payable; or
(ii) A brief is delivered before the commencement of trial, because in such event, the brief fee is payable in any event, but the payment of unused refreshers will still be governed by the above rule.

(e) Briefs are as a rule delivered and accepted on the understanding that Counsel may be justifiably prevented from attending at Court.
(f) Moreover, Counsel is entitled to return a brief if he has a commitment in the Court of Appeal, although dates therefor were fixed subsequent to the acceptance of the brief to be returned, in respect of a matter in which he appeared in the Court below or in cases of a complex nature where he was involved from the inception of the appeal.

Annex 18 (ii) (Paragraph 127) Reproduction of Circular No. 27/97 issued by the Law Society of Hong Kong re “Solicitors personally responsible for Barristers’ fees” (Revision of Principle)

Solicitors liability for barristers' fees: Revision to Principle 12.04 of the Guide.

1. The Council has resolved that non-payment of the proper fees of a barrister shall not constitute professional misconduct where there is reasonable excuse for such non-payment.

2. The following shall apply to all arrangement for barristers' fees save where there is a pre-existing agreement or arrangement subsisting at the date of this circular. (20th January 1997)

The Revised Principle: 12.04 of the Guide

3. Paragraph 12.04 of the Guide has been revised as follows:

"In the absence of reasonable excuse a solicitor is personally liable as a matter of professional conduct for the payment of a barrister's proper fees. Failure to obtain funds on account of a barrister's fees shall not of itself constitute reasonable excuse."
(Commentaries are unchanged.)

Annex 18 (iii) (Paragraph 127) Terms of Reference and Procedure of the Joint Tribunal

1. The Joint Tribunal, (formerly known as the Grey Areas Committee) shall be a Joint Tribunal of the Bar Council and the Law Society.

2. The membership of the Joint Tribunal shall comprise a panel of 10 barristers appointed by the Chairman ("the Chairman") of the Bar Association and 10 solicitors appointed by the President ("the President") of the Law Society.

3. The Joint Tribunal shall resolve disputes between members of the Bar Association and the Law Society relating to fees which are referred to it by the Chairman or the President.

4. Where the Chairman or the President is of the opinion that such a dispute should be referred to the Joint Tribunal, the Chairman or the President shall each inform the other and the parties ("the parties").

5. Within one month of such notice the Chairman and the President respectively shall nominate a barrister and a solicitor from the panel to form a Joint Tribunal to resolve the dispute and shall advise the parties of the same.

6. The party whose complaint forms the basis for the reference ("the Applicant") shall within 14 days of the Joint Tribunal's appointment serve copies of the Statement of his case, all relevant fee notes, correspondence between the parties, the Bar Council and/or the Law Society, and other documents in relation to the dispute to the other party (“the Respondent”), and a copy to each Joint Tribunal member. (Circular No. 56/13)

7. The Respondent shall prepare and supply copies of his Statement of Response within 14 days of receipt of the Applicant's case, to the Applicant and Joint Tribunal. (Circular No. 56/13)

8. The Applicant shall within 14 days make a Statement of Reply, if appropriate, with any further supporting documents and supply copies of the same to the Respondent and Joint Tribunal members. (Circular No. 56/13)

9. TThe parties shall provide copy letters on service of documents listed in paragraphs 6, 7 and 8 above only to the Bar Council and the Law Society.

10. The Law Society member and the Bar Association member of the Panel shall alternate as Chairman of the Panel.

11. The Joint Tribunal shall in its absolute discretion decide on the appropriate procedure to resolve the dispute subject to the provisions of paragraphs 6, 7, 8 and 13. The Joint Tribunal may within 28 days of receipt of the documents referred to above, invite the parties to:

(1) make representations in respect of the conduct of the dispute;
(2) adduce such or additional evidence or written or oral submissions as the Joint Tribunal deems necessary.

12. The Joint Tribunal may at its discretion stipulate or extend any time limit provided for in these Terms of Reference and Procedure.

13. Upon receipt of all documents and submissions and in any event within 28 days of receipt of the Statement of Reply the Joint Tribunal shall fix a time for any hearing, not later than 56 days thereafter or notify the parties that no hearing is considered appropriate.

14. The Joint Tribunal shall communicate its decision to the parties and to the Chairman and the President.

15. The Joint Tribunal shall give reasons for its decision which shall be final.

16. Payment of any sum found due shall be made within 14 days of the date of the notification in writing to the party required to make it of any award by the Joint Tribunal.

17. The Joint Tribunal shall have power to direct the payment of undisputed sums forthwith and payment shall be made within 14 days of any such interim award.

18. In the event of any failure to abide by the Joint Tribunal's decision on any award or interim award the Joint Tribunal shall refer the matter as professional misconduct to the Law Society or the Bar Council.

19. The Joint Tribunal may draft a guidance note for consideration by the Bar Council or the Law Society on the practice to be observed in similar circumstances.

Annex 19 (Paragraph 50(b)) Direct Professional Access Rules and Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement

1. Subject to these rules, a barrister may accept Direct Professional Access work from a member of a recognised professional body.

2. A professional body shall only be recognised for the purpose of these rules when it has been approved as a "recognised professional body" by the Bar Council.

3. In deciding whether to grant such recognition regard will be had to whether the body satisfies each of the following criteria:-

(a) its members provide skilled and specialist services;
(b) its affairs and the conduct of its members are regulated by a written constitution which among other matters -

(i) provides for admission to membership of persons who have satisfied by examination specified high standards of general and professional education, and
(ii) makes unethical or dishonourable conduct by a member a disciplinary offence and has an effective enforcement procedure for breach of its disciplinary rules;

(c) its members are likely to have a significant requirement to retain the services of a barrister for the benefit of their clients or employers and those engaging them. 
(Circular No. 20/96)

4. A barrister shall only be entitled to accept instructions in Direct Professional Access work from a member of a recognised professional body who should be his first point of contact and must be identified at the time of giving instructions and confirm that he or the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, member or employee is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of such work for an amount which he considers to be reasonable having regard to the nature of the work giving rise to such instructions. Such a member of the recognised professional body may be a director, partner, member or employee of a company, firm or other body giving instructions in that capacity in the course of his professional practice and assumes personal liability in respect of such instructions including the obligation to discharge the fees of the barristers promptly in addition to such other liability as may be agreed between the barrister and the member or on behalf of such company, firm or other body. In the case of payment of the barrister's fees, the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, member or employee will also be liable jointly with such a member.

5. A barrister shall not accept any brief or instructions in Direct Professional Access work unless he is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of such work for an amount which he considers to be reasonable having regard to the nature of the work which he is going to undertake pursuant to such instructions and a certificate issued by his insurer to the effect that he has professional indemnity insurance in respect of Direct Professional Access work and stating the period for which he is so insured has been supplied to the Bar Council.

6. A barrister must not accept any brief or instructions in Direct Professional Access work:-

(a) to receive or handle clients' money;
(b) to do substantial administrative work not normally performed by a practising barrister in Hong Kong;
(c) to do inter-partes work (for example the conduct of correspondence with an opposite party) of a kind not normally performed by a practising barrister in Hong Kong;
(d) to appear in the Court of Final Appeal, the High Court, the District Court or a Magistrate's Court;
(e) (or shall decline to act further) in a case in which at any stage he considers it in the interests of the lay client that a solicitor be instructed.

7. A barrister who accepts Direct Professional Access work must

(a) keep a case record (whether on card or computer) which sets out:-

(i) the date of receipt of the brief or instructions, the name of the professional client, the name of the case and any requirements of the professional client as to time limit;
(ii) the date on which the brief or instructions were accepted;
(iii) the terms on which the brief or instructions were accepted;
(iv) the dates of subsequent instructions, of the despatch of advices and other written work, of conferences and of telephone conversations;
(v) when agreed, the fee;
(vi) when made, any promises or undertakings as to the completion of the work;
(vii) as soon as they become apparent to the barrister, any time limits;

(b) retain:-

(i) copies of briefs and instructions (including supplemental instructions);
(ii) copies of all advices given and documents drafted or approved;
(iii) a list of all documents enclosed with any brief or instructions;
(iv) notes of all conferences and of all advices given on the telephone; and

(c) keep a forward diary (which may be kept on a chambers' basis or for each individual barrister provided that in either case it is easy to inspect and is regularly inspected) of all statutory or other time limits which are applicable to or which arise out of current Direct Professional Access matters.

8. Unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement, all briefs and instructions are deemed to be accepted by a barrister on the terms and conditions of the Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement which are reproduced below. Until the law is changed, by virtue of his status all instructions are accepted by a barrister without there being a contract. Accordingly, the Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement will be binding in honour only. A barrister is not obliged to adopt the Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement but is strongly recommended to do so and the terms should be confirmed in writing if possible before instructions are accepted.

9. Nothing in these rules shall affect the Overseas Practice Rules or any other rules in the Code of Conduct entitling a barrister to accept instructions from any person other than a solicitor.

10. Save as is in these rules otherwise provided the Code of Conduct shall apply to instructions received and accepted under these rules.

RECOMMENDED STANDARD TERMS OF ENGAGEMENT OF A BARRISTER UNDERTAKING DIRECT PROFESSIONAL ACCESS WORK

Preamble

(i) These Standard Terms of Engagement have been approved by the Bar Council. The Bar Council has further recognised [name of the recognised professional body] as a recognised professional body under and for the purposes of the Direct Professional Access Rules.
(ii) They are intended to apply in any case where a barrister is instructed by a member of [the name of the recognised professional body] in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct.
(iii) Any member of [name of the recognised professional body] will be deemed to instruct a barrister on these Standard Terms unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between that member and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter.

Definitions

In these Standard Terms:-

"Bar Code of Conduct" means the Code of Conduct for the Bar of Hong Kong for the time being in force;
"Direct Professional Access Rules" means the Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct;
"A recognised professional body" means a professional body recognised by the Bar Council under and for the purposes of the Direct Professional Access Rules;
"Instructing member" means a member of a recognised professional body from whom a barrister has accepted instructions in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules;
"Instructions" include a brief save where the context otherwise requires.

Instructions

1. A barrister has the right in circumstances set out in the Direct Professional Access Rules to refuse to accept instructions and these Standard Terms will apply only where a barrister has accepted instructions.

2.

(i) A barrister may only accept instructions from a member of a recognised professional body who is identified at the time of giving instructions and confirms that he or the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, member or employee is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions.
(ii) It shall accordingly be the duty of a member of such a body wishing to instruct a barrister to identify himself as the instructing member at the time of giving instructions and confirms that he or the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, member or employee is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions.

3.

(i) A barrister may only accept instructions from a member of a recognised professional body in a matter of a kind which falls generally within the professional expertise of that member of that professional body.
(ii) An instructing member warrants that the matter in which he is instructing the barrister is of a kind which falls substantially within the field in which he normally practises.

4.

(i) An instructing member should, in addition to instructing a barrister in his personal capacity, instruct the barrister in his capacity as a director, partner, member or employee of a company, firm or other body.
(ii) The instructing member warrants that he is authorised by the relevant company, firm or other body, as the case may be, to instruct the barrister.

5.

(i) Unless the instructing member otherwise stipulates and the barrister agrees, the barrister will deal with instructions other than a brief as soon as he reasonably can in the ordinary course of his work.
(ii) Where for any reason time is of the essence the instructing member must, when he delivers his instructions, so inform the barrister or his clerk or secretary and of the particular reason for urgency in order that the barrister or his clerk or secretary may decide whether in those circumstances he can accept the instructions. That information must be communicated to the barrister or his clerk or secretary separately from the instructions themselves.

6. Notwithstanding that instructions have been delivered to a barrister, the barrister shall not be deemed to have accepted those instructions until he has had a reasonable opportunity to peruse them and decide whether they are appropriate for Professional Direct Access.

7. Without prejudice to any other right which a barrister may have in accordance with the Bar Code of Conduct to return his instructions, a barrister shall be entitled at his complete discretion, which he shall exercise in the interests of the lay client, at any time to require, as a condition of his continuing to act in the matter on which he is instructed, that a solicitor shall take over the instructions or that the services of a solicitor shall otherwise be retained to assist in the future conduct of that matter. In such an event the instructing member shall have the option of withdrawing his instructions to the barrister or of complying with the barrister's request.

8.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed a barrister accepts a brief upon the understanding that he may be unavoidably prevented by a conflicting professional engagement from attending the case.
(ii) A barrister shall inform the instructing member immediately there is an appreciable risk that he may not be able to undertake a brief which he has accepted.
(iii) In the event that a barrister has to return a brief, he shall so far as practicable do so in sufficient time to enable another barrister to be engaged and to master the brief.

The Barrister's Fees

9. It is the obligation of the instructing member, jointly with the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, employee or member, to be responsible for the payment of the barrister's fees.

10.

(i) A barrister shall be entitled to require payment of his fee at the time of accepting instructions.
(ii) Otherwise the barrister's fees shall be paid promptly upon submission of a fee note.

11.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed, a fee note will be submitted at the conclusion of the matter on which the barrister is instructed.
(ii) If, however, that matter is protracted, an interim fee note or notes may be submitted at intervals of not less than two months.

12. A brief will only be accepted by a barrister after a fee has been agreed with the instructing member.

13. In the case of instructions other than a brief it is a matter for agreement between the instructing member and the barrister or his clerk or secretary whether the fee shall be agreed before the instructions are accepted or at any later date.

Copies of Instructions and Records of Advice

14. A barrister shall be entitled for the purposes of his records to retain his instructions or any papers delivered therewith or, if the instructing professional should require the return of such instructions and papers, to take and retain a copy of such instructions or papers and of any written advice, and if so requested by the barrister it shall be the duty of the instructing member to supply him with and to permit him to retain for those purposes a copy of such instructions, papers or advices.

15. In any case where a barrister gives advice orally it shall be the duty of the instructing member to make a written record of that advice and submit it to the barrister for his approval as soon as is practicable and in any event by such date as the barrister may reasonably require.

Annex 19A (Paragraph 50(b)) (Circular No. 5/97 & Circular No. 055/12) Direct Professional Access Rules and Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement for Direct Access by Arbitrators

1. Subject to these rules, a barrister may accept Direct Professional Access work from a member of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators, the Hong Kong Institute of Arbitrators or such other body of Arbitrators as may be specified in Annex 20.

2. A professional body shall only be recognised for the purpose of these rules when it has been approved as a "recognised professional body" by the Bar Council.

3. In deciding whether to grant such recognition regard will be had to whether the body satisfies each of the following criteria:-

(a) its members provide skilled and specialist services;
(b) its affairs and the conduct of its members are regulated by a written constitution which among other matters -

(i) provides for admission to membership of persons who have satisfied specified high standards of general and professional education, and
(ii) makes unethical or dishonourable conduct by a member a disciplinary offence and has an effective enforcement procedure for breach of its disciplinary rules;

(c) its members are likely to have a significant requirement to retain the services of a barrister for the benefit of their clients, employers or those engaging them.

4. A barrister shall only be entitled to accept instructions in Direct Professional Access work from a member of a recognised professional body who should be his first point of contact.

5. A barrister shall not accept any brief or instructions in Direct Professional Access work unless he is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of such work for an amount which he considers to be reasonable having regard to the nature of the work which he is going to undertake pursuant to such instructions and a certificate issued by his insurer to the effect that he has professional indemnity insurance in respect of Direct Professional Access work and stating the period for which he is so insured has been supplied to the Bar Council.

6. A barrister must not accept any brief or instructions in Direct Professional Access work:-

(a) to receive or handle clients' money;
(b) to do substantial administrative work not normally performed by a practising barrister in Hong Kong;
(c) to do inter-partes work (for example the conduct of correspondence with an opposite party) of a kind not normally performed by a practising barrister in Hong Kong;
(d) to appear in the Court of Final Appeal, the High Court, the District Court or a Magistrate Court;
(e) (or shall decline to act further) in a case in which at any stage he considers it in the interests of the lay client that a solicitor be instructed.

7. A barrister who accepts Direct Professional Access work must:

(a) keep a case record (whether on card or computer) which sets out:-

(i) the date of receipt of the brief or instructions, the name of the professional client, the name of the case and any requirements of the professional client as to time limit;
(ii) the date on which the brief or instructions were accepted;
(iii) the terms on which the brief or instructions were accepted;
(iv) the dates of subsequent instructions, of the despatch of advices and other written work, of conferences and of telephone conversations;
(v) when agreed, the fee;
(vi) when made, any promises or undertakings as to the completion of the work;
(vii) as soon as they become apparent to the barrister, any time limits;

(b) retain:-

(i) copies of briefs and instructions (including supplemental instructions);
(ii) copies of all advices given and documents drafted or approved;
(iii) a list of all documents enclosed with any brief or instructions;
(iv) notes of all conferences and of all advices given on the telephone; and

(c) keep a forward diary (which may be kept on a chambers' basis or for each individual barrister provided that in either case it is easy to inspect and is regularly inspected) of all statutory or other time limits which are applicable to or which arise out of current Direct Professional Access matters.

8. Unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement, all briefs and instructions are deemed to be accepted by a barrister on the terms and conditions of the Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement which are reproduced below. Until the law is changed, by virtue of his status all instructions are accepted by a barrister without there being a contract. Accordingly, the Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement will be binding in honour only. A barrister is not obliged to adopt the Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement but is strongly recommended to do so and the terms should be confirmed in writing if possible before instructions are accepted.

9. Nothing in these rules shall affect the Overseas Practice Rules or any other rules in the Code of Conduct entitling a barrister to accept instructions from any person other than a solicitor.

10. Save as is in these rules otherwise provided the Code of Conduct shall apply to instructions received and accepted under these rules.

RECOMMENDED STANDARD TERMS OF ENGAGEMENT OF A BARRISTER UNDERTAKING DIRECT PROFESSIONAL ACCESS WORK FOR ARBITRATORS

Preamble

(i) These Standard Terms of Engagement have been approved by the Bar Council. The Bar Council has further recognised the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators and the Hong Kong Institute of Arbitrators as recognised professional bodies under and for the purposes of the Direct Professional Access Rules.
(ii) They are intended to apply in any case where a barrister is instructed by a member of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators or the Hong Kong Institute of Arbitrators in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules in Annex 19A of the Bar Code of Conduct.
(iii) Any member of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators or the Hong Kong Institute of Arbitrators will be deemed to instruct a barrister on these Standard Terms unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between that member and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter.

Definitions

In these Standard Terms:-

"Bar Code of Conduct" means the Code of Conduct for the Bar of Hong Kong for the time being in force;
"Direct Professional Access Rules" means the Rules in Annex 19A of the Bar Code of Conduct;
"A recognised professional body" means a professional body recognised by the Bar Council under and for the purposes of the Direct Professional Access Rules;
"Instructing member" means a member of a recognised professional body from whom a barrister has accepted instructions in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules;
"Instructions" include a brief save where the context otherwise requires.

Instructions

1. A barrister has the right in circumstances set out in the Direct Professional Access Rules to refuse to accept instructions and these Standard Terms will apply only where a barrister has accepted instructions.

2.

(i) A barrister may only accept instructions from a member of a recognised professional body in a matter of a kind which falls generally within the professional expertise of that member of that professional body.
(ii) An instructing member warrants that the matter in which he is instructing the barrister is of a kind which falls substantially within the field in which he normally practises.

3. An instructing member instructs a barrister in his personal capacity and shall be regarded as the body instructing the barrister for the purposes of the Bar Code of Conduct.

4.

(i) Unless the instructing member otherwise stipulates and the barrister agrees, the barrister will deal with instructions other than a brief as soon as he reasonably can in the ordinary course of his work.
(ii) Where for any reason time is of the essence the instructing member must, when he delivers his instructions, so inform the barrister or his clerk or secretary and of the particular reason for urgency in order that the barrister or his clerk or secretary may decide whether in those circumstances he can accept the instructions. That information must be communicated to the barrister or his clerk or secretary separately from the instructions themselves.

5. Notwithstanding that instructions have been delivered to a barrister, the barrister shall not be deemed to have accepted those instructions until he has had a reasonable opportunity to peruse them and decide whether they are appropriate for Professional Direct Access.

6. Without prejudice to any other right which a barrister may have in accordance with the Bar Code of Conduct to return his instructions, a barrister shall be entitled at his complete discretion, which he shall exercise in the interest of the lay client, at any time to require, as a condition of his continuing to act in the matter on which he is instructed, that a solicitor shall take over the instructions or that the services of a solicitor shall otherwise be retained to assist in the future conduct of that matter. In such an event the instructing member shall have the option of withdrawing his instructions to the barrister or of complying with the barrister's request.

7.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed a barrister accepts a brief upon the understanding that he may be unavoidably prevented by a conflicting professional engagement from attending the case.
(ii) A barrister shall inform the instructing member immediately there is an appreciable risk that he may not be able to undertake a brief which he has accepted.
(iii) In the event that a barrister has to return a brief, he shall so far as practicable do so in sufficient time to enable another barrister to be engaged and to master the brief.

The Barrister's Fees

8. It is the obligation of the instructing member to be responsible for the payment of the barrister's fees.

9.

(i) A barrister shall be entitled to require payment of his fee at the time of accepting instructions.
(ii) Otherwise the barrister's fees shall be paid promptly upon submission of a fee note.

10.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed, a fee note will be submitted at the conclusion of the matter on which the barrister is instructed.
(ii) If, however, that matter is protracted, an interim fee note or notes may be submitted at intervals of not less than two months.

11. A brief will only be accepted by a barrister after a fee has been agreed with the instructing member.

12. In the case of instructions other than a brief it is a matter for agreement between the instructing member and the barrister or his clerk or secretary whether the fee shall be agreed before the instructions are accepted or at any later date.

Copies of Instructions and Records of Advice

13. A barrister shall be entitled for the purposes of his records to retain his instructions or any papers delivered therewith or, if the instructing professional should require the return of such instructions and papers, to take and retain a copy of such instructions or papers and of any written advice, and if so requested by the barrister it shall be the duty of the instructing member to supply him with and to permit him to retain for those purposes a copy of such instructions, papers or advices.

14. In any case where a barrister gives advice orally it shall be the duty of the instructing member to make a written record of that advice and submit it to the barrister for his approval as soon as is practicable and in any event by such date as the barrister may reasonably require.

Annex 19B (Paragraph 50(b)) (Circular No. 109/00) Direct Professional Access Rules and Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement for Direct Access by Members of the Taxation Institute of Hong Kong

1. Subject to these rules, a barrister may accept Direct Professional Access work from a member of the Taxation Institute of Hong Kong.

2. A professional body shall only be recognised for the purpose of these rules when it has been approved as a "recognised professional body" by the Bar Council.

3. In deciding whether to grant such recognition regard will be had to whether the body satisfies each of the following criteria:-

(a) its members provide skilled and specialist services;
(b) its affairs and the conduct of its members are regulated by a written constitution which among other matters -

(i) provides for admission to membership of persons who have satisfied specified high standards of general and professional education, and
(ii) makes unethical or dishonourable conduct by a member a disciplinary offence and has an effective enforcement procedure for breach of its disciplinary rules;

(c) its members are likely to have a significant requirement to retain the services of a barrister for the benefit of their clients, employers or those engaging them.

4. A barrister shall only be entitled to accept instructions in Direct Professional Access work from a member of a recognised professional body who should be his first point of contact.

5. A barrister shall not accept any brief or instructions in Direct Professional Access work unless he is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of such work for an amount which he considers to be reasonable having regard to the nature of the work which he is going to undertake pursuant to such instructions and a certificate issued by his insurer to the effect that he has professional indemnity insurance in respect of Direct Professional Access work and stating the period for which he is so insured has been supplied to the Bar Council.

6. A barrister must not accept any brief or instructions in Direct Professional Access work:-

(a) to receive or handle clients' money;
(b) to do substantial administrative work not normally performed by a practising barrister in Hong Kong;
(c) to do inter-partes work (for example the conduct of correspondence with an opposite party) of a kind not normally performed by a practising barrister in Hong Kong;
(d) to appear in the Court of Final Appeal, the High Court, the District Court or a Magistrate Court;
(e) (or shall decline to act further) in a case in which at any stage he considers it in the interests of the lay client that a solicitor be instructed.

7. A barrister who accepts Direct Professional Access work must:

(a) keep a case record (whether on card or computer) which sets out:-

(i) the date of receipt of the brief or instructions, the name of the professional client, the name of the case and any requirements of the professional client as to time limit;
(ii) the date on which the brief or instructions were accepted;
(iii) the terms on which the brief or instructions were accepted;
(iv) the dates of subsequent instructions, of the despatch of advices and other written work, of conferences and of telephone conversations;
(v) when agreed, the fee;
(vi) when made, any promises or undertakings as to the completion of the work;
(vii) as soon as they become apparent to the barrister, any time limits;

(b) retain:-

(i) copies of briefs and instructions (including supplemental instructions);
(ii) copies of all advices given and documents drafted or approved;
(iii) a list of all documents enclosed with any brief or instructions;
(iv) notes of all conferences and of all advices given on the telephone; and

(c) keep a forward diary (which may be kept on a chambers' basis or for each individual barrister provided that in either case it is easy to inspect and is regularly inspected) of all statutory or other time limits which are applicable to or which arise out of current Direct Professional Access matters.

8. Unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement, all briefs and instructions are deemed to be accepted by a barrister on the terms and conditions of the Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement which are reproduced below. Until the law is changed, by virtue of his status all instructions are accepted by a barrister without there being a contract. Accordingly, the Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement will be binding in honour only. A barrister is not obliged to adopt the Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement but is strongly recommended to do so and the terms should be confirmed in writing if possible before instructions are accepted.

9. Nothing in these rules shall affect the Overseas Practice Rules or any other rules in the Code of Conduct entitling a barrister to accept instructions from any person other than a solicitor.

10. Save as is in these rules otherwise provided the Code of Conduct shall apply to instructions received and accepted under these rules.

RECOMMENDED STANDARD TERMS OF ENGAGEMENT OF A BARRISTER UNDERTAKING DIRECT PROFESSIONAL ACCESS WORK FOR THE TAXATION INSTITUTE OF HONG KONG

Preamble

(i) These Standard Terms of Engagement have been approved by the Bar Council. The Bar Council has further recognised the Taxation Institute of Hong Kong as a recognised professional body under and for the purpose of the Direct Professional Access Rules.
(ii) They are intended to apply in any case where a barrister is instructed by a member of the Taxation Institute of Hong Kong in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules in Annex 19B of the Bar Code of Conduct.
(iii) Any member of the Taxation Institute of Hong Kong will be deemed to instruct a barrister on these Standard Terms unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between that member and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter.

Definitions

In these Standard Terms:-

"Bar Code of Conduct" means the Code of Conduct for the Bar of Hong Kong for the time being in force;
"Direct Professional Access Rules" means the Rules in Annex 19B of the Bar Code of Conduct;
"A recognised professional body" means a professional body recognised by the Bar Council under and for the purposes of the Direct Professional Access Rules;
"Instructing member" means a member of a recognised professional body from whom a barrister has accepted instructions in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules;
"Instructions" include a brief save where the context otherwise requires.

Instructions

1. A barrister has the right in circumstances set out in the Direct Professional Access Rules to refuse to accept instructions and these Standard Terms will apply only where a barrister has accepted instructions.

2.

(i) A barrister may only accept instructions from a member of a recognised professional body in a matter of a kind which falls generally within the professional expertise of that member of that professional body.
(ii) An instructing member warrants that the matter in which he is instructing the barrister is of a kind which falls substantially within the field in which he normally practises.

3. An instructing member instructs a barrister in his personal capacity and shall be regarded as the body instructing the barrister for the purposes of the Bar Code of Conduct.

4.

(i) Unless the instructing member otherwise stipulates and the barrister agrees, the barrister will deal with instructions other than a brief as soon as he reasonably can in the ordinary course of his work.
(ii) Where for any reason time is of the essence the instructing member must, when he delivers his instructions, so inform the barrister or his clerk or secretary and of the particular reason for urgency in order that the barrister or his clerk or secretary may decide whether in those circumstances he can accept the instructions. That information must be communicated to the barrister or his clerk or secretary separately from the instructions themselves.

5. Notwithstanding that instructions have been delivered to a barrister, the barrister shall not be deemed to have accepted those instructions until he has had a reasonable opportunity to peruse them and decide whether they are appropriate for Professional Direct Access.

6. Without prejudice to any other right which a barrister may have in accordance with the Bar Code of Conduct to return his instructions, a barrister shall be entitled at his complete discretion, which he shall exercise in the interest of the lay client, at any time to require, as a condition of his continuing to act in the matter on which he is instructed, that a solicitor shall take over the instructions or that the services of a solicitor shall otherwise be retained to assist in the future conduct of that matter. In such an event the instructing member shall have the option of withdrawing his instructions to the barrister or of complying with the barrister's request.

7.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed a barrister accepts a brief upon the understanding that he may be unavoidably prevented by a conflicting professional engagement from attending the case.
(ii) A barrister shall inform the instructing member immediately there is an appreciable risk that he may not be able to undertake a brief which he has accepted.
(iii) In the event that a barrister has to return a brief, he shall so far as practicable do so in sufficient time to enable another barrister to be engaged and to master the brief.

The Barrister's Fees

8. It is the obligation of the instructing member to be responsible for the payment of the barrister's fees.

9.

(i) A barrister shall be entitled to require payment of his fee at the time of accepting instructions.
(ii) Otherwise the barrister's fees shall be paid promptly upon submission of a fee note.

10.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed, a fee note will be submitted at the conclusion of the matter on which the barrister is instructed.
(ii) If, however, that matter is protracted, an interim fee note or notes may be submitted at intervals of not less than two months.

11. A brief will only be accepted by a barrister after a fee has been agreed with the instructing member.

12. In the case of instructions other than a brief it is a matter for agreement between the instructing member and the barrister or his clerk or secretary whether the fee shall be agreed before the instructions are accepted or at any later date.

Copies of Instructions and Records of Advice

13. A barrister shall be entitled for the purposes of his records to retain his instructions or any papers delivered therewith or, if the instructing professional should require the return of such instructions and papers, to take and retain a copy of such instructions or papers and of any written advice, and if so requested by the barrister it shall be the duty of the instructing member to supply him with and to permit him to retain for those purposes a copy of such instructions, papers or advices.

14. In any case where a barrister gives advice orally it shall be the duty of the instructing member to make a written record of that advice and submit it to the barrister for his approval as soon as is practicable and in any event by such date as the barrister may reasonably require.

Annex 19C (Paragraph 50(b)) (Circular No. 109/00) Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement of a Barrister Undertaking Direct Professional Access Work for Members of the Hong Kong Institute of Surveyors

Preamble

(i) These standard terms have been agreed and approved by the Hong Kong Institute of Surveyors and the Bar Council.
(ii) They are intended to apply in any case where a barrister is instructed by a member of the H.K.I.S. in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct.
(iii) Members of the H.K.I.S. are recommended to use these Standard Terms, varied where appropriate, when agreeing terms on which the member is instructing a barrister.

Definitions

In these Standard Terms:

"H.K.I.S." means the Hong Kong Institute of Surveyors
"Bar Code of Conduct" means the code of Conduct of the Bar of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region for the time being in force;
"Direct Professional Access Rules" means the Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct;
"Instructing member" means an associate or fellow member of the H.K.I.S. from whom a barrister has accepted instructions in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules;
"Instruction" include a brief save where the context otherwise requires.

Instructions

1. A barrister has the right in circumstances set out in the Direct Professional Access Rules to refuse to accept instructions and these Standard Terms will apply only where a barrister has accepted instructions.

2.

(i) A barrister may only accept instructions from a member of the H.K.I.S. who is identified at the time of giving instructions and confirms that he or the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, member or employee is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions;
(ii) It shall accordingly be the duty of a member of the H.K.I.S. wishing to instruct a barrister to identify himeself as the instructing member at the time of giving instructions and confirm that he or the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, member or employee is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions;

3.

(i) A barrister may only accept instructions from a member of the H.K.I.S. in a matter of a kind which falls generally within the professional expertise of members of the H.K.I.S.

4.

(i) An instructing member may instruct a barrister in his capacity as a director, partner, member or employee of a company, firm or other body.
(ii) In any case where a barrister accepts instructions from an instructing member in his capacity as a director, partner, member or employee of a company, firm or other body, the obligations of the instructing member under these Standard Terms shall be joint and several obligations of him and that company firm or other body, unless otherwise agreed between the barrister and his instructing member.

5.

(i) Unless the instructing member otherwise stipulates and the barrister agrees the barrister will deal with instructions other than a brief as soon as he reasonably can in the ordinary course of his work.a
(ii) Where for any reason there is any urgency the instructing member must, when he delivers his instructions, inform the barrister or his clerk or secretary of the precise deadline(s) involved in order that the barrister or his clerk or secretary may decide whether in those circumstances he can accept the instructions. The information must be communicated to the barrister or his clerk or secretary separately from the instructions themselves. The barrister or his clerk or secretary must inform the instructing member without delay whether he can or cannot accept instructions.

6. Notwithstanding that instructions have been delivered to a barrister, the barrister shall not be deemed to have accepted those instructions until he has had a reasonable opportunity to peruse them and decide whether they are appropriate for Direct Professional Access.

7. Without prejudice to any other right which a barrister may have in accordance with the Bar Code of Conduct to return his instructions, a barrister shall be entitled at his complete discretion, which he shall exercise in the interests of the lay client, at any time to require, as a condition of his continuing to act in the matter on which he is instructed, that a solicitor shall take over the instructions, or that the services of a solicitor shall otherwise be retained to assist in the future conduct of that matter. In such an event the instructing member shall have the option of withdrawing his instructions to the barrister or of complying with his request.

8.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed a barrister accepts a brief upon the understanding that he may unavoidably be prevented by a conflicting professional engagement from attending the case.
(ii) A barrister shall inform the instructing member immediately there is an appreciable risk that he may not be able to undertake a brief which he was accepted.
(iii) In the event that a barrister has to return a brief, he shall so far as practicable, do so in sufficient time to enable another barrister to be engaged and to master the brief.

The Barrister's Fees

9. It is the obligation of the instructing member, jointly with the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, employee or member to be responsible for the payment of the barrister's fees.

10.

(i) A barrister shall be entitled to require payment of his fee at the time of accepting instructions.
(ii) Otherwise the barrister's fee shall be paid promptly upon submission of a fee note.

11.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed, a fee note will be submitted at the conclusion of the matter on which a barrister is instructed.
(ii) If, however, that matter is protracted, an interim fee note or notes may be submitted at intervals of not less than two months.

12. A brief will only be accepted by a barrister after a fee has been agreed with the instructing member.

13. In the case of instructions other than a brief it is matter for agreement between the instructing member and the barrister or his clerk or secretary whether the fee shall be agreed before the instructions are accepted or at any later date.

Copies of Instructions and Records of Advice

14. A barrister shall be entitled for the purposes of his records to retain his instructions or any papers delivered therewith or, if the instructing member should require the return of such instructions and papers, to take and retain a copy of such instructions and papers and of any written advice, and if so requested by the barrister it shall be the duty of the instructing member to supply him with and to permit him to retain for those purposes a copy of such instructions, papers or advice.

15. In any case where a barrister gives advice orally it shall be the duty of the instructing member to make a written record of that advice and submit it to the barrister for his approval as soon as is practicable and in any event by such date as the barrister may reasonably require.

Annex 19D (Paragraph 50 (b)) (Circular No. 127/04) Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement of a Barrister Undertaking Direct Professional Access Work for the Office of the Ombudsman

Preamble

(i) These Standard Terms of Engagement have been agreed and approved by the Office of the Ombudsman and the Bar Council. The Bar Council has recognised the Office of the Ombudsman, as a recognised professional body under and for the purposes of the Direct Professional Access Rules.
(ii) They are intended to apply in any case where a barrister is instructed by an Officer of the Office of the Ombudsman in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct.
(iii) Any Officer of the Office of the Ombudsman (as defined hereunder) will be deemed to instruct a barrister on these Standard Terms unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between that Officer and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter.

Definitions

In these Standard Terms:-

"O.T.O." means the Office of the Ombudsman, Hong Kong.
"Bar Code of Conduct" means the Code of Conduct for the Bar of Hong Kong for the time being in force;
"Direct Professional Access Rules" means the Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct;
"Instructing member" means an Officer of O.T.O from whom a barrister has accepted instructions in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules;
"Instructions" include a brief save where the context otherwise requires.
"Officer of O.T.O" means any of the following staff of O.T.O.,

(a) all Directorate Officers, i.e. Deputy Ombudsman and Assistant Ombudsman;
(b) all Complaint Officers comprising Chief Complaints Officers, Senior Complaints Officers and Complaints Officers;
(c) Chief Executive Officer, Senior External Relations Officer, Senior Office Administrator and Accountant of O.T.O.

Instructions

1. A barrister has the right in circumstances set out in the Direct Professional Access Rules to refuse to accept instructions and these Standard Terms will apply only where a barrister has accepted instructions.

2.

(i) A barrister may only accept instructions from an Officer of O.T.O. who is identified at the time of giving instructions and (subject to sub-paragraph (iii) below) confirms that he or the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, member or employee and/or the O.T.O. is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions.
(ii) It shall accordingly be the duty of an Officer of O.T.O. wishing to instruct a barrister to identify himself as the instructing member at the time of giving instructions and (subject to sub-paragraph (iii) below) confirms that he or the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, member or employee and/or the O.T.O. is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions.
(iii) A barrister may accept instructions from an Officer of O.T.O. without the confirmation referred to in sub-paragraph (i) above and an Officer of O.T.O. is not under the duty to give the confirmation referred to in sub-paragraph (ii) above so long as section 18A of the Ombudsman Ordinance (Cap. 397) remains in force in the following form – “No person acting in good faith shall be personally liable for any civil liability or claim whatever in respect of any act done or omitted to be done in the performance or purported performance of any function, or the exercise or purported exercise of any power under this Ordinance.”

3.

(i) A barrister may only accept instructions from an Officer of O.T.O. in a matter of a kind which falls generally within the duties, responsibilities, or professional expertise or practice of that Officer of O.T.O.
(ii) An instructing member warrants that the matter in which he is instructing the barrister is of a kind which falls substantially within the field in which he normally practises.

4.

(i) An instructing member should, in addition to instructing a barrister in his personal capacity, instruct the barrister in his capacity as a director, partner, member or employee of a company, firm or other body and/or the O.T.O., as the case may be.
(ii) The instructing member warrants that he is authorised by the relevant company, firm or other body and/or the O.T.O., as the case may be, to instruct the barrister. In the case where the barrister accepts instructions from an instructing member in his capacity as a director, partner, member or employee of a company, firm or other body, then the obligations of the instructing member under these standard terms shall be joint and several obligations of him and that company, firm or other body, unless otherwise agreed between the barrister and his instructing member.

5.

(i) Unless the instructing member otherwise stipulates and the barrister agrees, the barrister will deal with instructions other than a brief as soon as he reasonably can in the ordinary course of his work.
(ii) Where for any reason time is of the essence the instructing member must, when he delivers his instructions, so inform the barrister or his clerk or secretary and of the particular reason for urgency in order that the barrister or his clerk or secretary may decide whether in those circumstances he can accept the instructions. That information must be communicated to the barrister or his clerk or secretary separately from the instructions themselves.

6. Notwithstanding that instructions have been delivered to a barrister, the barrister shall not be deemed to have accepted those instructions until he has had a reasonable opportunity to peruse them and decide whether they are appropriate for Professional Direct Access.

7. Without prejudice to any other right which a barrister may have in accordance with the Bar Code of Conduct to return his instructions, a barrister shall be entitled at his complete discretion, which he shall exercise in the interests of the lay client, at any time to require, as a condition of his continuing to act in the matter on which he is instructed, that a solicitor shall take over the instructions or that the services of a solicitor shall otherwise be retained to assist in the future conduct of that matter. In such an event the instructing member shall have the option of withdrawing his instructions to the barrister or of complying with the barrister’s request.

8.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed a barrister accepts a brief upon the understanding that he may be unavoidably prevented by a conflicting professional engagement from attending the case.
(ii) A barrister shall inform the instructing member immediately there is an appreciable risk that he may not be able to undertake a brief which he has accepted.
(iii) In the event that a barrister has to return a brief, he shall so far as practicable do so in sufficient time to enable another barrister to be engaged and to master the brief.

The Barrister’s Fees

9. It is the obligation of the instructing member, jointly with the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, employee or member and/or with the O.T.O., to be responsible for the payment of the barrister’s fees.

10.

(i) A barrister shall be entitled to require payment of his fee at the time of accepting instructions.
(ii) Otherwise the barrister’s fees shall be paid promptly upon submission of a fee note.

11.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed, a fee note will be submitted at the conclusion of the matter on which the barrister is instructed.
(ii) If, however, that matter is protracted, an interim fee note or notes may be submitted at intervals of not less than two months.

12. A brief will only be accepted by a barrister after a fee has been agreed with the instructing member.

13. In the case of instructions other than a brief it is a matter for agreement between the instructing member and the barrister or his clerk or secretary whether the fee shall be agreed before the instructions are accepted or at any later date.

Copies of Instructions and Records of Advice

14. A barrister shall be entitled for the purposes of his records to retain his instructions or any papers delivered therewith or, if the instructing member should require the return of such instructions and papers, to take and retain a copy of such instructions or papers and of any written advice, and if so requested by the barrister it shall be the duty of the instructing member to supply him with and to permit him to retain for those purposes a copy of such instructions, papers or advices.

15. In any case where a barrister gives advice orally it shall be the duty of the instructing member to make a written record of that advice and submit it to the barrister for his approval as soon as is practicable and in any event by such date as the barrister may reasonably require.

16. The invalidity or unenforceability of any provision or part(s) of any provision will not affect the validity or enforceability of any other provisions herein and any invalid or unenforceable provision or part(s) thereof will be severable.

Annex 19E (Paragraph 50 (b)) (Circular No. 053/07) Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement of a Barrister Undertaking Direct Professional Access Work for the Legal Aid Services Council

Preamble

(i) These Standard Terms of Engagement have been agreed and approved by the Legal Aid Services Council and the Bar Council. The Bar Council has recognised the Legal Aid Services Council, as a recognised professional body under and for the purposes of the Direct Professional Access Rules.
(ii) They are intended to apply in any case where a barrister is instructed by the Legal Aid Services Council in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct.
(iii) The Legal Aid Services Council will be deemed to instruct a barrister on these Standard Terms unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between the Legal Aid Services Council and the barrister whom it instructs in any particular matter.

Definitions

In these Standard Terms:-

"LASC" means the Legal Aid Services Council.
"Bar Code of Conduct" means the Code of Conduct for the Bar of Hong Kong for the time being in force;
"Direct Professional Access Rules" means the Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct;
"Instructing LASC" means the LASC from which a barrister has accepted instructions in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules;
"Instructions" include a brief save where the context otherwise requires.

Instructions

1. A barrister has the right in circumstances set out in the Direct Professional Access Rules to refuse to accept instructions and these Standard Terms will apply only where a barrister has accepted instructions.

2.       

(i) A barrister may only accept instructions from LASC in a matter of a kind which falls generally within the functions of LASC.
(ii) When giving instruction, LASC warrants that the matter in which it is instructing the barrister is of a kind which falls substantially within the functions of LASC.

3.       

(i) Unless the instructing LASC otherwise stipulates and the barrister agrees, the barrister will deal with instructions other than a brief as soon as he reasonably can in the ordinary course of his work.
(ii) Where for any reason time is of the essence LASC must, when it delivers its instructions, so inform the barrister or his clerk or secretary and of the particular reason for urgency in order that the barrister or his clerk or secretary may decide whether in those circumstances he can accept the instructions.  That information must be communicated to the barrister or his clerk or secretary separately from the instructions themselves.

4. Notwithstanding that instructions have been delivered to a barrister, the barrister shall not be deemed to have accepted those instructions until he has had a reasonable opportunity to peruse them and decide whether they are appropriate for Professional Direct Access.

5. Without prejudice to any other right which a barrister may have in accordance with the Bar Code of Conduct to return his instructions, a barrister shall be entitled at his complete discretion, which he shall exercise in the interests of the lay client, at any time to require, as a condition of his continuing to act in the matter on which he is instructed, that a solicitor shall take over the instructions or that the services of a solicitor shall otherwise be retained to assist in the future conduct of that matter.  In such an event the instructing LASC shall have the option of withdrawing his instructions to the barrister or of complying with the barrister’s request.

6.        

(i) Unless otherwise agreed a barrister accepts a brief upon the understanding that he may be unavoidably prevented by a conflicting professional engagement from attending the case.
(ii) A barrister shall inform the instructing LASC immediately there is an appreciable risk that he may not be able to undertake a brief which he has accepted.
(iii) In the event that a barrister has to return a brief, he shall so far as practicable do so in sufficient time to enable another barrister to be engaged and to master the brief.

The Barrister's Fees

7. It is the obligation of the instructing LASC to be responsible for the payment of the barrister’s fees.

8.

(i) A barrister shall be entitled to require payment of his fee at the time of accepting instructions.
(ii) Otherwise the barrister’s fees shall be paid promptly upon submission of a fee note.

9.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed, a fee note will be submitted at the conclusion of the matter on which the barrister is instructed.
(ii) If, however, that matter is protracted, an interim fee note or notes may be submitted at intervals of not less than two months.

10. A brief will only be accepted by a barrister after a fee has been agreed with the instructing LASC.

11. In the case of instructions other than a brief it is a matter for agreement between the instructing LASC and the barrister or his clerk or secretary whether the fee shall be agreed before the instructions are accepted or at any later date.

Copies of Instructions and Records of Advice

12. A barrister shall be entitled for the purposes of his records to retain his instructions or any papers delivered therewith or, if the instructing LASC should require the return of such instructions and papers, to take and retain a copy of such instructions or papers and of any written advice, and if so requested by the barrister it shall be the duty of the instructing LASC to supply him with and to permit him to retain for those purposes a copy of such instructions, papers or advices.

13. In any case where a barrister gives advice orally it shall be the duty of the instructing LASC to make a written record of that advice and submit it to the barrister for his approval as soon as is practicable and in any event by such date as the barrister may reasonably require.

14. The invalidity or unenforceability of any provision or part(s) of any provision will not affect the validity or enforceability of any other provisions herein and any invalid or unenforceable provision or part(s) thereof will be severable.

Annex 19F (Paragraph 50 (b)) (Circular No. 095/11) Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement of a Barrister Undertaking Direct Professional Access Work for the Office of the Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data

Preamble

(i) These Standard Terms of Engagement have been agreed and approved by the Office of the Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data (“PCPD”) and the Bar Council. The Bar Council has recognized the Office of the PCPD as a recognized professional body under and for the purposes of the Direct Professional Access Rules.
(ii) They are intended to apply in any case where a barrister is instructed by an Officer of the Office of the PCPD in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct.  For the purpose of the application of the Rules in Annex 19, unless the context otherwise requires, an Officer of the Office of the PCPD shall be deemed to be a “member of a recognized professional body”, with the relevant and corresponding “recognized professional body” being the Office of the PCPD.
(iii) Any Officer of the Office of the PCPD (as defined hereunder) will be deemed to instruct a barrister on these Standard Terms unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between that Officer and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter.

Definitions

In these Standard Terms:-

"Bar Code of Conduct" means the Code of Conduct for the Bar of Hong Kong for the time being in force;
"Direct Professional Access Rules" means the Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct;
"Instructing officer" means an Officer of Office of the PCPD from whom a barrister has accepted instructions in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules;
"Instructions" include a brief save where the context otherwise requires.
"Office of the PCPD" shall mean the office by the name of the Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data established under section 5 of the Personal Data (Privacy) Ordinance (Cap. 486);
"Officer of the Office of the PCPD" means any of the following staff of the Office of the PCPD:

(a) Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data; 
(b) Deputy Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data; 
(c) Chief Legal Counsel; 
(d) Senior Legal Counsel 
(e) Legal Counsel; 
(f) Chief Personal Data Officer.

 

Instructions

1. A barrister has the right in circumstances set out in the Direct Professional Access Rules to refuse to accept instructions and these Standard Terms will apply only where a barrister has accepted instructions.

2.       

(i) A barrister may only accept instructions from an Officer of the Office of the PCPD who is identified at the time of giving instructions and confirms that he and/or the Office of the PCPD is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions.
(ii) It shall accordingly be the duty of an Officer of the Office of the PCPD wishing to instruct a barrister to identify himself as the instructing officer at the time of giving instructions and confirms that he and/or the Office of the PCPD is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions.

3.       

(i) A barrister may only accept instructions from an Officer of the Office of the PCPD in a matter of a kind which falls generally within the duties, responsibilities, or professional expertise or practice of that Officer of the Office of the PCPD.
(ii) An instructing officer warrants that the matter in which he is instructing the barrister is of a kind which falls substantially within his field of duties, responsibilities, professional expertise and/or practice.

4.  

(i) An instructing officer should, in addition to instructing a barrister in his personal capacity, instruct the barrister in his capacity as an officer of the Office of the PCPD.
(ii) The instructing officer warrants that he is authorized by the Office of the PCPD to instruct the barrister under these Standard Terms (subject to any exclusion and/or variation as agreed between the barrister and the instructing officer (who also warrants that he is authorized by the Office of the PCPD to agree to any such exclusion and/or variation)), and the obligations of the instructing officer under these Standard Terms (subject to any exclusion and/or variation, as the case may be) shall be joint and several obligations of him and the Office of the PCPD.

5.

(i) Unless the instructing officer otherwise stipulates and the barrister agrees, the barrister will deal with instructions other than a brief as soon as he reasonably can in the ordinary course of his work.
(ii) Where for any reason time is of the essence the instructing officer must, when he delivers his instructions, so inform the barrister or his clerk or secretary and of the particular reason for urgency in order that the barrister or his clerk or secretary may decide whether in those circumstances he can accept the instructions. That information must be communicated to the barrister or his clerk or secretary separately from the instructions themselves.

6. Notwithstanding that instructions have been delivered to a barrister, the barrister shall not be deemed to have accepted those instructions until he has had a reasonable opportunity to peruse them and decide whether they are appropriate for Professional Direct Access in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules.

7. Without prejudice to any other right which a barrister may have in accordance with the Bar Code of Conduct to return his instructions, a barrister shall be entitled at his complete discretion, which he shall exercise in the interests of the lay client, at any time to require, as a condition of his continuing to act in the matter on which he is instructed, that a solicitor shall take over the instructions or that the services of a solicitor shall otherwise be retained to assist in the future conduct of that matter. In such an event the instructing officer shall have the option of withdrawing his instructions to the barrister or of complying with the barrister’s request.

8.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed a barrister accepts a brief upon the understanding that he may be unavoidably prevented by a conflicting professional engagement from attending the case.
(ii) A barrister shall inform the instructing officer immediately there is an appreciable risk that he may not be able to undertake a brief which he has accepted.
(iii) In the event that a barrister has to return a brief, he shall so far as practicable do so in sufficient time to enable another barrister to be engaged and to master the brief.

The Barrister's Fees

9. It is the obligation of the instructing officer, jointly with the Office of the PCPD, to be responsible for the payment of the barrister’s fees.

10.

(i) A barrister shall be entitled to require payment of his fee at the time of accepting instructions.
(ii) Otherwise the barrister’s fees shall be paid promptly upon submission of a fee note.

11.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed, a fee note will be submitted at the conclusion of the matter on which the barrister is instructed.
(ii) If, however, that matter is protracted, an interim fee note or notes may be submitted at intervals of not less than two months.

12. A brief will only be accepted by a barrister after a fee has been agreed with the instructing officer.

13. In the case of instructions other than a brief it is a matter for agreement between the instructing officer and the barrister or his clerk or secretary whether the fee shall be agreed before the instructions are accepted or at any later date.

Copies of Instructions and Records of Advice

14. A barrister shall be entitled for the purposes of his records to retain his instructions or any papers delivered therewith or, if the instructing officer should require the return of such instructions and papers, to take and retain a copy of such instructions or papers and of any written advice, and if so requested by the barrister it shall be the duty of the instructing officer to supply him with and to permit him to retain for those purposes a copy of such instructions, papers or advices.

15. In any case where a barrister gives advice orally it shall be the duty of the instructing officer to make a written record of that advice and submit it to the barrister for his approval as soon as is practicable and in any event by such date as the barrister may reasonably require

16. The invalidity or unenforceability of any provision or part(s) of any provision will not affect the validity or enforceability of any other provisions herein and any invalid or unenforceable provision or part(s) thereof will be severable.

Annex 19G (Paragraph 5 (b)) (Circular No. 095/11) Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement of a Barrister Undertaking Direct Professional Access Work for the Estate Agents Authority

Preamble

(i) These Standard Terms of Engagement have been agreed and approved by the Estate Agents Authority (“the Authority”) and the Bar Council. The Bar Council has recognized the Authority as a recognized professional body under and for the purposes of the Direct Professional Access Rules.
(ii) They are intended to apply in any case where a barrister is instructed by an Officer of the Authority in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct.  For the purpose of the application of the Rules in Annex 19, unless the context otherwise requires, an Officer of the Authority shall be deemed to be a “member of a recognized professional body”, with the relevant and corresponding “recognized professional body” being the Authority
(iii) Any Officer of the Authority (as defined hereunder) will be deemed to instruct a barrister on these Standard Terms unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between that Officer and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter.

Definitions

In these Standard Terms:-

"Bar Code of Conduct" means the Code of Conduct for the Bar of Hong Kong for the time being in force;
"Direct Professional Access Rules" means the Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct;
"Instructing officer" means an Officer of the Authority from whom a barrister has accepted instructions in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules;
"Instructions" include a brief save where the context otherwise requires.
"the Authority" shall mean the Estate Agents Authority established under section 4 of the Estate Agents Ordinance (Cap. 511);
"Officer” means any of the following staff of the Authority:

  (i)  The Chief Executive Officer; 
  (ii)  Director of Services; 
  (iii)  Director of Operations; 
  (iv)  Director of Regulatory Affairs and General Counsel; 
  (v)   Legal Counsel; 
  (vi)  Senior Manager (Operations); 
  (vii)  Manager (Complaints); 
  (viii) Manager (Enforcement); 
  (ix)  Manager (Legal Services & Examination); 
  (x)   Manager (Disciplinary Proceedings); 
  (xi)  Manager (Licensing); 
  (xii)  Manager (Corporate Communications); 
  (xiii) Manager (Human Resources & Administration); 
  (xiv) Manager (Professional Development); 
  (xv)  Manager (Finance & Information Technology)

 

Instructions

1. A barrister has the right in circumstances set out in the Direct Professional Access Rules to refuse to accept instructions and these Standard Terms will apply only where a barrister has accepted instructions.

2.        

(i) A barrister may only accept instructions from an Officer of the Authority who is identified at the time of giving instructions and confirms that he and/or the Authority is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions.
(ii) It shall accordingly be the duty of an Officer of the Authority wishing to instruct a barrister to identify himself as the instructing officer at the time of giving instructions and confirms that he and/or the Authority is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions.
(iii) A barrister may accept instructions from an Officer of the Authority without the confirmation referred to in sub-paragraph (i) above and an Officer of the Authority is not under the duty to give the confirmation referred to in sub-paragraph (ii) above so long as section 54(1) of the Estate Agents Ordinance (Cap. 511) remains in force in the following form – “No personal liability shall be incurred by any person in respect of anything done, or omitted to be done, by him in good faith in relation to the performance or purported performance of any function under this Ordinance (including a function duly delegated under this Ordinance)”.

3.        

(i) A barrister may only accept instructions from an Officer of the Authority in a matter of a kind which falls generally within the functions of the Authority.
(ii) When giving instructions, the Officer of the Authority (on his own behalf and on behalf of the Authority) warrants that the matter in which he is instructing the barrister is of a kind which falls substantially within the functions of the Authority.

4.

(i) An instructing officer should, in addition to instructing a barrister in his personal capacity, instruct the barrister in his capacity as an officer of the Authority.
(ii) The instructing officer warrants that he is authorized by the Authority to give the warranty referred to in paragraph 3(ii) above and to instruct the barrister under these Standard Terms (subject to any exclusion and/or variation as agreed between the instructing officer (who also warrants that he is authorized by the Authority to agree to any such exclusion and/or variation)), and the obligations of the instructing officer under these Standard Terms (subject to any exclusion and/or variation, as the case may be) shall be joint and several obligations of him and the Authority.

5.

(i) Unless the instructing officer otherwise stipulates and the barrister agrees, the barrister will deal with instructions other than a brief as soon as he reasonably can in the ordinary course of his work.
(ii) Where for any reason time is of the essence the instructing officer must, when he delivers his instructions, so inform the barrister or his clerk or secretary and of the particular reason for urgency in order that the barrister or his clerk or secretary may decide whether in those circumstances he can accept the instructions. That information must be communicated to the barrister or his clerk or secretary separately from the instructions themselves.

6. Notwithstanding that instructions have been delivered to a barrister, the barrister shall not be deemed to have accepted those instructions until he has had a reasonable opportunity to peruse them and decide whether they are appropriate for Professional Direct Access.

7. Without prejudice to any other right which a barrister may have in accordance with the Bar Code of Conduct to return his instructions, a barrister shall be entitled at his complete discretion, at any time to require, as a condition of his continuing to act in the matter on which he is instructed, that a solicitor shall take over the instructions or that the services of a solicitor shall otherwise be retained to assist in the future conduct of that matter. In such an event the instructing officer shall have the option of withdrawing his instructions to the barrister or of complying with the barrister’s request.

8.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed a barrister accepts a brief upon the understanding that he may be unavoidably prevented by a conflicting professional engagement from attending the case.
(ii) A barrister shall inform the instructing officer immediately there is an appreciable risk that he may not be able to undertake a brief which he has accepted.
(iii) In the event that a barrister has to return a brief, he shall so far as practicable do so in sufficient time to enable another barrister to be engaged and to master the brief.

The Barrister's Fees

9. It is the obligation of the instructing officer, jointly with the Authority, to be responsible for the payment of the barrister’s fees.

10. 

(i) A barrister shall be entitled to require payment of his fee at the time of accepting instructions.
(ii) Otherwise the barrister’s fees shall be paid promptly upon submission of a fee note.

11.

(i) Unless otherwise agreed, a fee note will be submitted at the conclusion of the matter on which the barrister is instructed.
(ii) If, however, that matter is protracted, an interim fee note or notes may be submitted at intervals of not less than two months.

12. A brief will only be accepted by a barrister after a fee has been agreed with the instructing officer.

13. In the case of instructions other than a brief it is a matter for agreement between the instructing officer and the barrister or his clerk or secretary whether the fee shall be agreed before the instructions are accepted or at any later date.

Copies of Instructions and Records of Advice

14. A barrister shall be entitled for the purposes of his records to retain his instructions or any papers delivered therewith or, if the instructing officer should require the return of such instructions and papers, to take and retain a copy of such instructions or papers and of any written advice, and if so requested by the barrister it shall be the duty of the instructing officer to supply him with and to permit him to retain for those purposes a copy of such instructions, papers or advices.

15. In any case where a barrister gives advice orally it shall be the duty of the instructing officer to make a written record of that advice and submit it to the barrister for his approval as soon as is practicable and in any event by such date as the barrister may reasonably require.

16. The invalidity or unenforceability of any provision or part(s) of any provision will not affect the validity or enforceability of any other provisions herein and any invalid or unenforceable provision or part(s) thereof will be severable.

Annex 19H (Paragraph 50 (b)) (Circular No. 050/12) Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement of a Barrister Undertaking Direct Professional Access Work fro the Equal Opportunities Commission

Preamble

(i) These Standard Terms of Engagement have been agreed and approved by the Equal Opportunities Commission (the “Commission”) and the Bar Council. The Bar Council has recognized the Commission as a recognized professional body under and for the purposes of the Direct Professional Access Rules.

(ii) They are intended to apply in any case where a barrister is instructed by an Officer of the Commission in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct. For the purpose of the application of the Rules in Annex 19, unless the context otherwise requires, an Officer of the Commission shall be deemed to be a “member of a recognized professional body”, with the relevant and corresponding “recognized professional body” being the Commission.

(iii) Any Officer of the Commission (as defined hereunder) will be deemed to instruct a barrister on these Standard Terms unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between that Officer and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter.

(iv) The Commission confirms that it has procured and agrees that it will maintain adequate insurance cover against the risks of professional liability arising from or incidental to the legal services or work undertaken by its Instructing Officer (as defined hereunder).

Definitions

In these Standard Terms:-

“Bar Code of Conduct” means the Code of Conduct for the Bar of Hong Kong for the time being in force;

“Direct Professional Access Rules” means the Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct;

“Instructing officer” means an Officer of the Commission from whom a barrister has accepted instructions in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules;

 “Instructions” include a brief save where the context otherwise requires;

“Commission” shall mean the body corporate by the name of Equal Opportunities Commission established under section 63 of the Sex Discrimination Ordinance (Cap. 480);

"Officer of the Commission" means any of the following staff of the Commission acting personally and as a representative of the Commission:

  (a)  Chairman;
  (b)  Director of Operations;
  (c)  Chief Legal Counsel; ;
  (d) Legal Counsel;;
  (e)  Assistant Legal Counsel.

Instructions

1. A barrister has the right in circumstances set out in the Direct Professional Access Rules to refuse to accept instructions and these Standard Terms will apply only where a barrister has accepted instructions.

2.       (i)A barrister may only accept instructions from an Officer of the Commission who is identified at the time of giving instructions and confirms that he and the Commission are insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions.

(ii) It shall accordingly be the duty of an Officer of the Commission wishing to instruct a barrister to identify himself as the instructing officer at the time of giving instructions and confirms that he and the Commission are insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions.

3.       (i) A barrister may only accept instructions from an Officer of the Commission in a matter of a kind which falls generally within the duties, responsibilities, or professional expertise or practice of that Officer of the Commission.

(ii) An instructing officer warrants that the matter in which he is instructing the barrister is of a kind which falls substantially within his field of duties, responsibilities, professional expertise and/or practice.

4.       (i) An instructing officer should, in addition to instructing a barrister in his personal capacity, instruct the barrister in his capacity as an officer of the Commission.

(ii) The instructing officer warrants that he is authorized by the Commission to instruct the barrister under these Standard Terms (subject to any exclusion and/or variation as agreed between the barrister and the instructing officer (who also warrants that he is authorized by the Commission to agree to any such exclusion and/or variation)), and the obligations of the instructing officer under these Standard Terms (subject to any exclusion and/or variation, as the case may be) shall be joint and several obligations of him and the Commission.

5.       (i) Unless the instructing officer otherwise stipulates and the barrister agrees, the barrister will deal with instructions other than a brief as soon as he reasonably can in the ordinary course of his work.

(ii) Where for any reason time is of the essence the instructing officer must, when he delivers his instructions, so inform the barrister or his clerk or secretary and of the particular reason for urgency in order that the barrister or his clerk or secretary may decide whether in those circumstances he can accept the instructions. That information must be communicated to the barrister or his clerk or secretary separately from the instructions themselves.

6. Notwithstanding that instructions have been delivered to a barrister, the barrister shall not be deemed to have accepted those instructions until he has had a reasonable opportunity to peruse them and decide whether they are appropriate for Professional Direct Access in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules.

7. Without prejudice to any other right which a barrister may have in accordance with the Bar Code of Conduct to return his instructions, a barrister shall be entitled at his complete discretion, which he shall exercise in the interests of the lay client, at any time to require, as a condition of his continuing to act in the matter on which he is instructed, that a solicitor shall take over the instructions or that the services of a solicitor shall otherwise be retained to assist in the future conduct of that matter. In such an event the instructing officer shall have the option of withdrawing his instructions to the barrister or of complying with the barrister’s request.

8.       (i) Unless otherwise agreed a barrister accepts a brief upon the understanding that he may be unavoidably prevented by a conflicting professional engagement from attending the case.

(ii) A barrister shall inform the instructing officer immediately there is an appreciable risk that he may not be able to undertake a brief which he has accepted.

(iii) In the event that a barrister has to return a brief, he shall so far as practicable do so in sufficient time to enable another barrister to be engaged and to master the brief.

The Barrister's Fees

9. It is the obligation of the instructing officer, jointly with the Commission, to be responsible for the payment of the barrister’s fees.

10. (i) A barrister shall be entitled to require payment of his fee at the time of accepting instructions.

(ii) Otherwise the barrister’s fees shall be paid promptly upon submission of a fee note.

11. (i) Unless otherwise agreed, a fee note will be submitted at the conclusion of the matter on which the barrister is instructed.

(ii) If, however, that matter is protracted, an interim fee note or notes may be submitted at intervals of not less than two months.

12. A brief will only be accepted by a barrister after a fee has been agreed with the instructing officer.

13. In the case of instructions other than a brief it is a matter for agreement between the instructing officer and the barrister or his clerk or secretary whether the fee shall be agreed before the instructions are accepted or at any later date.

Copies of Instructions and Records of Advice

14. A barrister shall be entitled for the purposes of his records to retain his instructions or any papers delivered therewith or, if the instructing officer should require the return of such instructions and papers, to take and retain a copy of such instructions or papers and of any written advice, and if so requested by the barrister it shall be the duty of the instructing officer to supply him with and to permit him to retain for those purposes a copy of such instructions, papers or advices.

15. In any case where a barrister gives advice orally it shall be the duty of the instructing officer to make a written record of that advice and submit it to the barrister for his approval as soon as is practicable and in any event by such date as the barrister may reasonably require.

16. The invalidity or unenforceability of any provision or part(s) of any provision will not affect the validity or enforceability of any other provisions herein and any invalid or unenforceable provision or part(s) thereof will be severable.

Annex 19I (Paragraph 50 (b)) (Circular No. 053/15) Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement of a Barrister Undertaking Direct Professional Access Work for Members of the Hong Kong Institution of Engineers

Preamble

(i) These standard terms have been agreed and approved by the Hong Kong Institution of Engineers (“HKIE”) and the Bar Council.

(ii) They are intended to apply in any case where a practising barrister is instructed by a Qualified Instructing Member of the HKIE in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct.

(iii) Qualified Instructing Members of the HKIE are recommended to use these Standard Terms, varied where appropriate, when agreeing terms on which the member is instructing a practising barrister.

Definitions

In these Standard Terms:-

“HKIE” means the Hong Kong Institution of Engineers;

“Bar Code of Conduct” means the code of Conduct of the Bar of Hong Kong Special Administrative Region for the time being in force;

“Direct Professional Access Rules” means the Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct;

(i) “Qualified Instructing Member” means Corporate Member (a Fellow or Member) of the HKIE; and

(ii) “Instructing Member” means a Qualified Instructing Member from whom a practising barrister has accepted instructions in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules;

“Instruction” include a brief save where the context otherwise requires.

Save as aforesaid, words and expressions used in these Standard Terms shall bear the same meanings as they are defined in the Bar Code of Conduct for the time being in force and references to numbered annexes are to the annexes thereto.

Instructions

1. A practising barrister has the right in circumstances set out in the Direct Professional Access Rules to refuse to accept instructions and these Standard Terms will apply only where a barrister has accepted instructions.

2.       (i)A practising barrister may only accept instructions from a Qualified Instructing Member who is identified at the time of giving instructions and confirms that he or the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, member or employee is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions.

(ii) It shall accordingly be the duty of a Qualified Instructing Member wishing to instruct a practising barrister to identify himself as the instructing member at the time of giving instructions and confirm that he or the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, member or employee is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions.

3. A practising barrister may only accept instructions from a Qualified Instructing Member in a matter of a kind which falls generally within the professional expertise of members of the HKIE.

4.       (i) An Instructing Member may instruct a practising barrister in his capacity as a director, partner, member or employee of a company, firm or other body.

(ii) In any case where a barrister accepts instructions from an Instructing Member in his capacity as a director, partner, member or employee of a company, firm or other body, the obligations of the Instructing Member under these Standard Terms shall be joint and several obligations of him and that company firm or other body, unless otherwise agreed between the barrister and the Instructing Member.

5.       (i) Unless the Instructing Member otherwise stipulates and the barrister agrees, the barrister will deal with instructions other than a brief as soon as he reasonably can in the ordinary course of his work.

(ii) Where for any reason there is any urgency the Instructing Member must, when he delivers his instructions, inform the barrister or his clerk or secretary of the precise deadline(s) involved in order that the barrister or his clerk or secretary may decide whether in those circumstances he can accept the instructions. The information must be communicated to the barrister or his clerk or secretary separately from the instructions themselves. The barrister or his clerk or secretary must inform the Instructing Member without delay whether he can or cannot accept instructions.

6. Notwithstanding that instructions have been delivered to a practising barrister, the barrister shall not be deemed to have accepted those instructions until he has had a reasonable opportunity to peruse them and decide whether they are appropriate for Direct Professional Access in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules.

7. Without prejudice to any other right which a practising barrister may have in accordance with the Bar Code of Conduct to return his instructions, a barrister shall be entitled at his complete discretion, which he shall exercise in the interests of the lay client, at any time to require, as a condition of his continuing to act in the matter on which he is instructed, that a solicitor shall take over the instructions, or that the services of a solicitor shall otherwise be retained to assist in the future conduct of that matter. In such an event the Instructing Member shall have the option of withdrawing his instructions to the barrister or of complying with his request.

8.       (i) Unless otherwise agreed a barrister accepts a brief upon the understanding that he may unavoidably be prevented by a conflicting professional engagement from attending the case.

(ii) The barrister shall inform the Instructing Member immediately there is an appreciable risk that he may not be able to undertake a brief which he was accepted.

(iii) In the event that the barrister has to return a brief, he shall so far as practicable, do so in sufficient time to enable another practising barrister to be engaged and to master the brief.

The Barrister's Fees

9. It is the obligation of the Instructing Member, jointly with the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, employee or member to be responsible for the payment of the barrister’s fees.

10.      (i) A barrister shall be entitled to require payment of his fee at the time of accepting instructions.

(ii) Otherwise the barrister’s fee shall be paid promptly upon submission of a fee note.

11.      (i) Unless otherwise agreed, a fee note will be submitted at the conclusion of the matter on which a barrister is instructed.

(ii) If, however, that matter is protracted, an interim fee note or notes may be submitted at intervals of not less than two months.

12. A brief will only be accepted by a barrister after a fee has been agreed with the Instructing Member.

13. In the case of instructions other than a brief it is matter for agreement between the Instructing Member and the barrister or his clerk or secretary whether the fee shall be agreed before the instructions are accepted or at any later date.

Copies of Instructions and Records of Advice

14. A barrister shall be entitled for the purposes of his records to retain his instructions or any papers delivered therewith or, if the Instructing Member should require the return of such instructions and papers, to take and retain a copy of such instructions and papers and of any written advice, and if so requested by the barrister it shall be the duty of the Instructing Member to supply him with and to permit him to retain for those purposes a copy of such instructions, papers or advice.

15. In any case where a barrister gives advice orally it shall be the duty of the Instructing Member to make a written record of that advice and submit it to the barrister for his approval as soon as practicable and in any event by such date as the barrister may reasonably require.

16. The invalidity or unenforceability of any provision or part(s) of any provision will not affect the validity or enforceability of any other provisions herein and any invalid or unenforceable provision or part(s) thereof will be severable.

Annex 19J (paragraph 50(b))(Circular No. 066/16) Recommended Standard Terms of Engagement of a Practising Barrister Undertaking Direct Professional Access Work for Members of the Financial Dispute Resolution Centre

Preamble

  1. These Standard Terms of Engagement have been approved by the Financial Dispute Resolution Centre (“FDRC”) and the Bar Council. The Bar Council has further recognised the FDRC as a recognised professional body under and for the purposes of the Direct Professional Access Rules.

  2. They are intended to apply in any case where a practising barrister is instructed by a Qualified Instructing Member of the FDRC in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct.

  3. Qualified Instructing Members of the FDRC are recommended to use these Standard Terms, varied where appropriate, when agreeing to terms on which the member is instructing a practising barrister.

Definitions

In these Standard Terms:-

“FDRC” means the Financial Dispute Resolution Centre, being a professional body recognised by the Bar Council under and for the purposes of the Direct Professional Access Rules;

“Bar Code of Conduct” means the Code of Conduct for the Bar of Hong Kong for the time being in force;

“Direct Professional Access Rules” means the Rules in Annex 19 of the Bar Code of Conduct;

  1. “Qualified Instructing Member” means the Secretary to the FDRC Disciplinary Committee, the (Assistant) Dispute Resolution Manager of the FDRC or the Complaint Officer for the disciplinary procedures on behalf of the FDRC; and

  2. “Instructing Member” means a Qualified Instructing Member from whom a practising barrister has accepted instructions in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules;

  3. “Instructions” include a brief save where the context otherwise requires.

Save as aforesaid, words and expressions used in these Standard Terms shall bear the same meanings as they are defined in the Bar Code of Conduct for the time being in force and references to numbered annexes are to the annexes thereto.

Instructions

  1. A practising barrister has the right in circumstances set out in the Direct Professional Access Rules to refuse to accept instructions and these Standard Terms will apply only where a barrister has accepted instructions.

  2. (i) A practising barrister may only accept instructions from a Qualified Instructing Member who is identified at the time of giving instructions and confirms that he or the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, member or employee is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions.

    (ii) It shall accordingly be the duty of a Qualified Instructing Member wishing to instruct a practising barrister to identify himself as the instructing member at the time of giving instructions and confirms that he or the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, member or employee is insured against claims for professional negligence in respect of the matter giving rise to such instructions.

  3. (i) A practising barrister may only accept instructions from a Qualified Instructing Member in a matter of a kind which falls generally within the professional expertise of members of the FDRC.

    (ii) An Instructing Member warrants that the matter in which he is instructing the practising barrister is of a kind which falls substantially within the field in which he normally practises.

  4. (i) An Instructing Member may instruct a practising barrister in his capacity as a director, partner, member or employee of a company, firm or other body.

    (ii) The instructing member warrants that he is authorised by the relevant company, firm or other body, as the case may be, to instruct the barrister.

(iii) In any case where a practising barrister accepts instructions from an Instructing Member in his capacity as a director, partner, member or employee of a company, firm or other body, the obligations of the Instructing Member under these Standard Terms shall be joint and several obligations of him and that company firm or other body, unless otherwise agreed between the barrister and the Instructing Member.

  1. (i) Unless the Instructing Member otherwise stipulates and the practising barrister agrees, the practising barrister will deal with instructions other than a brief as soon as he reasonably can in the ordinary course of his work.

    (ii) Where, for any reason, time is of the essence, the Instructing Member must, when he delivers his instructions, so inform the practising barrister or his clerk or secretary and of the particular reason for urgency in order that the practising barrister or his clerk or secretary may decide whether in those circumstances he can accept the instructions. That information must be communicated to the practising barrister or his clerk or secretary separately from the instructions themselves.

  2. Notwithstanding that instructions have been delivered to a practising barrister, the practising barrister shall not be deemed to have accepted those instructions until he has had a reasonable opportunity to peruse them and decide whether they are appropriate for Direct Professional Access in accordance with the Direct Professional Access Rules.

  3. Without prejudice to any other right which a practising barrister may have in accordance with the Bar Code of Conduct to return his instructions, a practising barrister shall be entitled at his complete discretion, which he shall exercise in the interests of the lay client, at any time to require, as a condition of his continuing to act in the matter on which he is instructed, that a solicitor shall take over the instructions or that the services of a solicitor shall otherwise be retained to assist in the future conduct of that matter. In such an event the Instructing Member shall have the option of withdrawing his instructions to the barrister or of complying with the barrister's request.

  4. (i) Unless otherwise agreed a barrister accepts a brief upon the understanding that he may be unavoidably prevented by a conflicting professional engagement from attending the case.

    (ii) The practising barrister shall inform the Instructing Member immediately there is an appreciable risk that he may not be able to undertake a brief which he has accepted.

    (iii) In the event that the practising barrister has to return a brief, he shall so far as practicable do so in sufficient time to enable another barrister to be engaged and to master the brief.

The Barrister's Fees

  1. It is the obligation of the Instructing Member, jointly with the company, firm or other body of which he is a director, partner, employee or member, to be responsible for the payment of the barrister’s fees.

  2. (i) A barrister shall be entitled to require payment of his fee at the time of accepting instructions.

    (ii) Otherwise the barrister’s fees shall be paid promptly upon submission of a fee note.

  3. (i) Unless otherwise agreed, a fee note will be submitted at the conclusion of the matter on which the barrister is instructed.

    (ii) If, however, that matter is protracted, an interim fee note or notes may be submitted at intervals of not less than two months.

  4. A brief will only be accepted by a barrister after a fee has been agreed with the instructing member.

  5. In the case of instructions other than a brief it is a matter for agreement between the Instructing Member and the barrister or his clerk or secretary whether the fee shall be agreed before the instructions are accepted or at any later date.

Copies of Instructions and Records of Advice

  1. A barrister shall be entitled for the purposes of his records to retain his instructions or any papers delivered therewith or, if the Instructing Member should require the return of such instructions and papers, to take and retain a copy of such instructions or papers and of any written advice, and if so requested by the barrister it shall be the duty of the Instructing Member to supply him with and to permit him to retain for those purposes a copy of such instructions, papers or advices.

  2. In any case where a barrister gives advice orally it shall be the duty of the Instructing Member to make a written record of that advice and submit it to the barrister for his approval as soon as is practicable and in any event by such date as the barrister may reasonably require.

  3. The invalidity or unenforceability of any provision or part(s) of any provision will not affect the validity or enforceability of any other provisions herein and any invalid or unenforceable provision or part(s) thereof will be severable.

 

 

 

ANNEX 20

 (paragraph 50)

 

ACCEPTANCE OF BRIEF OR INSTRUCTIONS DIRECTLY FROM PERSONS AUTHORISED BY CUSTOM OR THE BAR COUNCIL

 

[Add Para. xiii]

 

(xiii)        The Financial Dispute Resolution Centre

 

Address

Unit 3701-4, 37/F, Sunlight Tower, 248 Queen’s Road East, Wan Chai

Telephone

3199 5100

Fax

2565 8662

Qualified Instructing Members

The Secretary to the FDRC Disciplinary Committee, the (Assistant) Dispute Resolution Manager of the FDRC or the Complaint Officer for the disciplinary procedures on behalf of the FDRC

               

(Note:  In respect of direct access by members of the Financial Dispute Resolution Centre, the Direct Professional Access Rules, and the recommended standard terms of engagement Annex 19J, unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between the Instructing Member and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter, apply.)

 

                                                                                    (Circular No. 066/16)

 

 

Annex 20 (Paragraph 50) Acceptance of Brief or Instructions Directly from Persons Authorised by Custom or the Bar Council

1. The following are the exceptions authorised by custom as referred to in paragraph 50 of the Code of Conduct:

(a) Instructions from Patent and Trade Mark Agents.

2. The following are the exceptions authorised by the Bar Council as referred to in paragraph 50 of the Code of Conduct:
(a) Instructions from the Duty Lawyer Service;
(b) Provision of advisory service at centres of the Duty Lawyer Service;
(c) Provision of services pursuant to the Scheme for Pro Bono work organised under the supervision of the Council 
(d) Provision of advisory service to the Medical, Dental and Chiropractors' Councils (Circular No. 72/96) and the Veterinary Surgeons Board (Circular No. 67/97); and other tribunals or bodies exercising judicial or quasi-judicial functions as established by statute (Circular No. 8/99); and the Licensing Appeals Board;"
(e) Instructions from foreign lawyers (para 170);
(f) Instructions from members of the following recognised professional bodies(addresses updated pursuant to Bar Council resolution on 31 May 2012):

(i) The Hong Kong Institute of Certified Public Accountants

Address: 37/F, Wu Chung House
213 Queen’s Road East
Wanchai, Hong Kong
Telephone: 2287 7228 / 2528 9000 (Hotline)
Fax: 2865 6776 / 2865 6603

(ii) The Hong Kong Institute of Chartered Secretaries

Address: 3/F, Hong Kong Diamond Exchange Building 
8 Duddell Street
Central, Hong Kong
Telephone: 2881 6177
Fax: 2881 5050

(iii) The Chartered Institute of Arbitrators

Address: International Arbitration & Mediation Centre
12 Bloomsbury Square, 
London WC1A 2LP
United Kingdom
Telephone: +44 (0)20 7421 7444
Fax: +44 (0)20 7404 4023

(Note: In respect of direct access by members of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators, the Direct Professional Access Rules, and the recommended standard terms of engagement, unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between the Instructing Member and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter, in Annex 19A shall apply.)

(iv) The Taxation Institute of Hong Kong

Address: 21/F, Kam Sang Building
255-257 Des Voeux Road Central
Hong Kong
Telephone: 2810 0438
Fax: 2523 1263

(Note: In respect of direct access by members of The Taxation Institute of Hong Kong, the Direct Professional Access Rules, and the recommended standard terms of engagement, unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between the Instructing Member and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter, in Annex 19B shall apply.)

(v) The Hong Kong Institute of Surveyors

Address: Suite 801, 8/F, Jardine House
1 Connaught Place, Central
Hong Kong
Telephone: 2526 3679
Fax: 2868 4612

(Note: In respect of direct access by members of the Hong Kong Institute of Surveyors, the recommended standard terms of engagement are contained in Annex 19C.)

(Circular No. 109/00)

(vi) The Office of the Ombudsman, Hong Kong

Address: 30/F, China Merchants Tower
Shun Tak Centre
168-200 Connaught Road Central
Hong Kong
Telephone: 2629 0533
Fax: 2882 8149

(Circular No. 050/04)

(Note: In respect of direct access by the Office of the Ombudsman, Hong Kong, the recommended standard terms of engagement in Annex 19D shall, unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between the Instructing Member and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter, apply.)

(Circular No. 008/05) 

(vii) The Legal Aid Services Council 

Address : Room 1601, 16th Floor 
Top Glory Tower 
262 Gloucester Road 
Causeway Bay, Hong Kong 
Telephone: 2838 5378 
Fax: 2838 5053

(Note: In respect of direct access by the Legal Aid Services Council, the recommended standard terms of engagement in Annex 19E shall, unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between the Legal Aid Services Council and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter, apply.)

(Circular No. 053/07) 

(viii) The Office of the Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data 

Address : 12/F, 248 Queen’s Road East, 
Wanchai, 
Hong Kong. 
Telephone: 2827 2827
Fax: 2877 7026

(Note: In respect of direct access by the Office of the Privacy Commissioner for Personal Data, the recommended standard terms of engagement in Annex 19F shall, unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between the Instructing Officer and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter, apply.)

(Circular No. 095/11) 

(ix) The Estate Agents Authorit

Address : 48/F Hopewell Centre,
183 Queen’s Road East,
Wanchai 
Hong Kong. 
Telephone: 2598 9550
Fax: 2877 7026

(Note: In respect of direct access by the Estate Agents Authority, the recommended standard terms of engagement in Annex 19G shall, unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between the Instructing Officer and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter, apply.)

(Circular No. 095/11)

(x) Equal Opportunities Commission

Address : 19/F, Cityplaza Three
14 Taikoo Wan Road
Taikoo Shing
Hong Kong
Telephone: 2106 2178
Fax: 2824 3892

(Note: In respect of direct access by the Equal Opportunities Commission, the recommended standard terms of engagement in Annex 19H shall, unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between the Instructing Officer and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter, apply.)

(Circular No. 052/12)

(xi)The Hong Kong Institute of Arbitrators

Address: c/o Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre 38/F, Two Exchange Square 8 Connaught Place Hong Kong
Telephone: 2525 2381
Fax: 2524 2171

(Note: In respect of direct access by members of the Hong Kong Institute of Arbitrators, the Direct Professional Access Rules, and the recommended standard terms of engagement, unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between the Instructing Member and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter, in Annex 19A shall apply.)

(Circular No. 055/12)

(xii)The Hong Kong Institution of Engineers

Address: 9/F Island Beverley, No 1 Great George Street, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong
Telephone: 2895 4446
Fax: 2577 7791

Qualified Instructing Members: Corporate Member 
(i.e. a Fellow or a Member of HKIE)

(Note: In respect of direct access by members of the Hong Kong Institution of Engineers, the Direct Professional Access Rules, and the recommended standard terms of engagement, unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between the Instructing Member and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter, Annex 19I apply.)

(Circular No. 053/15) 

(xiiI)   The Financial Dispute Resolution Centre

Address:      Unit 3701-4, 37/F, Sunlight Tower,

248 Queen’s Road East, Wan Chai

Telephone:  3199 5100

Fax:             2565 8662

Qualified Instructing Members: 

The Secretary to the FDRC Disciplinary Committee, the (Assistant) Dispute Resolution Manager of the FDRC or the Complaint Officer for the disciplinary procedures on behalf of the FDRC

 (Note:        In respect of direct access by members of the Hong Kong Institution of Engineers, the Direct Professional Access Rules, and the recommended standard terms of engagement Annex 19J, unless and to the extent that they are excluded or varied by agreement between the Instructing Member and the barrister whom he instructs in any particular matter, apply.)

(Circular No. 066/16)

 

 

 

The Rules, Regulations and By-laws of the Hong Kong Bar Association

THE HONG KONG BAR ASSOCIATION

INTERPRETATION

1. In these presents, unless the context otherwise requires:-

"The Bar” shall mean the Bar of Hong Kong.
"The Bar Association” shall mean the Hong Kong Bar Association as constituted by these presents.
"The Bar Council” shall mean the Executive Committee of the Bar Association.
"These presents” shall mean these regulations or other regulations for the time being of the Bar Association.
"The Chairman” shall mean the Chairman of the Bar Association and shall include the Acting Chairman, if any.
"The Vice-Chairman” shall mean the Vice-Chairman or one of the Vice-Chairmen of the Bar Association.
"The Honorary Secretary” shall include any person elected to perform or actually performing the duties of Secretary and Treasurer.
"The Deputy Honorary Secretary” shall mean any person appointed or elected to perform or actually performing the duties of Deputy Honorary Secretary.
(Circular No.016 /07)

"Extraordinary Resolution" shall mean a resolution passed by a majority of not less than three-fourths of Members as, being present in person or by proxy (as provided in Regulation 40A hereof) and entitled so to do, vote at a General Meeting of the Bar Association of which notice specifying the intention to propose the resolution as an Extraordinary Resolution has been duly given.

"Practising Barrister" shall mean a barrister who has been admitted to practise in Hong Kong and who is entitled and holds himself out as willing to do so, not being otherwise employed in a whole-time occupation.

"Employed Barrister" shall mean a barrister who has been admitted to practise in Hong Kong and is engaged to provide legal advice or services for his employer under a contract of employment.

"Member" shall mean a practising barrister or an employed barrister who is a Member of the Bar Association.

"Associate Member" shall mean a barrister not being a Member who is an Associate Member of the Bar Association.

"The By-Laws" shall mean the By-Laws of the Bar Association as herein contained, including such amendments and additions as may from time to time be duly made.

"In writing" shall mean written, printed or lithographed, or partly one and partly another, and other modes of representing or reproducing words in a visible form.

Where by any provision of these presents a certain number of days' or clear days' notice of a matter is to be given, Saturdays and general holidays (as listed in the Schedule to the General Holidays Ordinance (Cap. 149) from time to time) shall not be included in calculating the sufficiency of the length of notice where the number is seven or less, and Saturdays and such general holidays shall be included in calculating the sufficiency of the length of notice where the number is eight or more.

Words importing the singular number only shall include the plural, and vice versa.

Words importing the masculine gender shall also import the feminine.

Objects

2. The objects for which the Bar Association is established are to consider all matters affecting the profession and the administration of justice and to take such action thereon as it deems proper.

Without prejudice to the generality of the foregoing, such matters include:-

(a) the maintenance of the honour and independence of the Bar and the defence of the Bar in its relations with the Judiciary and the Executive;
(b) the improvement, in Hong Kong, of the administration of justice, procedure, the arrangement of business, law reporting, and trial by jury;
(c) the establishment and maintenance of a system of prompt and efficient legal advice and aid for those persons in need thereof, irrespective of their capacity to pay;
(d) the promotion and support of law reform;
(e) the prescribing of rules of professional conduct, discipline and etiquette;
(f) the furtherance of good relations and co-operation between the two branches of the legal profession;
(g) the furtherance of good relations and understanding between the Bar and (a) the Judiciary, (b) the Law Officers of the Department of Justice, (c) the public;
(h) the furtherance of good relations between the Bar and lawyers of other countries; and
(i) the protection of the public right of access to the courts and of representation by Counsel before courts and tribunals; and
(j) the encouragement of legal education, and the study of jurisprudence;
(k) to raise funds by means of public or private appeals or otherwise and to make charitable donations and donations generally for the education, support, assistance and welfare of law students and law graduates, pupils, barristers and other persons who qualify for assistance or benefit under any Fund established under the auspices of the Hong Kong Bar Association.
(l) to establish a Fund to be known as “The Hong Kong Barristers’ Benevolent Fund” (which name was changed on the 20th day of January, 2011 to, and has since then been known as, "The Hong Kong Bar Association - Brook Bernacchi Barristers' Benevolent Fund") for the purpose of giving financial assistance to the needy and deserving members of the Hong Kong Bar Association who are or have been in practice in Hong Kong and to their husbands, wives, widows, widowers, children and dependants and to raise money for such Fund and to operate the same in such manner and subject to such Rules as the Bar Council shall determine.

Constitution

3. The Bar Association shall consist of Members and Associate Members.

(a) Any practising barrister or employed barrister shall be entitled, upon payment of the prescribed annual fee, to be a Member and so long as he pays the said annual fee shall remain a Member until he resigns his membership or ceases to be a practising barrister or an employed barrister.
(b) Any barrister admitted to practise in Hong Kong, not being a Member nor a member of the Judiciary, shall, and any barrister admitted to practise only in jurisdictions other than Hong Kong may with the approval of the Bar Council, upon payment of the prescribed annual fee be, and so long as he pays the said annual fee remain, an Associate Member until he resigns his membership or ceases to be a barrister.

4. The Chairman shall be elected at the Annual General Meeting. The person so elected shall hold office until the corresponding meeting in the next year when he shall be eligible for re-election provided that no person shall hold such office for more than three consecutive periods. For the purposes hereof a period shall mean a period elapsing between two consecutive elections held pursuant to this regulation. Only Members of the Inner Bar of Hong Kong or Members of 10 years’ standing at the Bar shall be eligible for election to the office of Chairman. Only practising barristers shall be eligible for election to the office of Chairman.

4A.     

(1) There shall be at least one but not more than two Vice-Chairmen who shall be elected at the Annual General Meeting. If more than one candidate is proposed for the office of the Vice-Chairman, there shall be two Vice-Chairmen elected at the Annual General Meeting.
(2) The person or persons so elected shall hold office until the corresponding meeting in the next year when he or they shall be eligible for re-election provided that no person shall hold such office for more than three consecutive periods and subject to Regulation 6(2). For the purposes hereof a period shall mean a period elapsing between two consecutive elections held pursuant to this regulation.
(3) Only Members of the Inner Bar of Hong Kong or Members of 10 years’ standing at the Bar shall be eligible for election to the office of Vice-Chairman. Only practising barristers shall be eligible for election to the office of Vice-Chairman.
(4) If and so long as the Chairman is incapacitated from acting for reasons of health or otherwise or is absent from Hong Kong, the Senior Vice-Chairman or if he in turn be incapacitated or absent, the other Vice-Chairman shall be the Acting Chairman of the Bar Association. Seniority shall be determined in accordance with Regulation 17.
(5) The Vice-Chairman or Vice-Chairmen shall also assist the Chairman in the discharge of such of his duties and functions, including duties and functions performed ex officio, as the Chairman may from time to time request.

5. There shall be an Honorary Secretary of the Bar Association who shall be elected at the Annual General Meeting. The Member so elected shall hold office until the corresponding meeting in the next year when he shall be eligible for re-election, subject to Regulation 6(2). The Honorary Secretary shall also fulfil the functions and duties of Treasurer.

5A. There shall be a Deputy Honorary Secretary of the Bar Association who shall be elected at the Annual General Meeting save that the Deputy Honorary Secretary for the year of 2007/2008 shall be appointed by the Bar Council from the Elected Members of the same year.  The Member so elected or appointed shall hold office until the corresponding meeting in the next year when he shall be eligible for re-election, subject to Regulation 6(2).  The Deputy Honorary Secretary shall assist the Honorary Secretary in the discharge of such of his duties and functions, including duties and functions performed ex officio, as the Chairman, Vice-Chairmen and Honorary Secretary may from time to time request.
(Circular No. 016 /07)

Bar Council

6.        

(1) There shall be an Executive Committee which shall be known as the Bar Council. The Bar Council shall consist of the Chairman, who shall ex officio be Chairman of the Bar Council, the Vice-Chairman or Vice-Chairmen, the Honorary Secretary elected under Regulation 5 hereof, the Deputy Honorary Secretary appointed or elected under Regulation 5A hereof (Circular No. 016 /07), and eleven other Members (hereinafter referred to as "the Elected Members") six of whom shall be of not less than five years’ standing at the Bar and five of whom may be of less than five years’ standing at the Bar. Not more than two of the Elected Members shall be an employed barrister. The proportion herein set forth shall as far as practicable be maintained in filling up vacancies in the Elected Members.
(2) Subject to Sub-regulation (3) hereof, no person shall be eligible to hold office on the Bar Council for more than 6 consecutive years.
(3) For the avoidance of doubt, a person eligible under Regulation 4 to be elected as Chairman shall remain eligible to be so elected, to hold office and to be re-elected in accordance with the aforesaid Regulation even though he may have held office on the Bar Council as Vice-Chairman, Honorary Secretary, Deputy Honorary Secretary (Circular No. 016/07),  Elected or Co-opted Members for 6 consecutive years immediately prior to his election as Chairman notwithstanding the provisions of Sub-regulation (2) hereof.

7.        

(1) One-half of the Elected Members, or if their number is not a multiple of two, then the number nearest to but not exceeding one-half, shall retire from office at the next Annual General Meeting. Those to retire shall be those who have been longest in office since their last election or appointment. As between Members of equal length of service the Members to retire shall, in the absence of agreement, be selected from them by lot.
(2) Elected Members retiring from office shall be eligible for re-election subject to Regulation 6(2).

Elections

8. Every candidate for the office of Chairman, Vice-Chairman, Elected Member, Honorary Secretary and Deputy Honorary Secretary (save for the year of 2007/2008) (Circular No. 016 /07) shall be proposed in writing signed by at least two Members. The proposal form shall be endorsed by the candidate that he is prepared to serve in the capacity proposed if elected and shall be addressed to the Honorary Secretary so as to reach him not less than three, nor more than five, clear weeks before the date fixed for the Annual General Meeting at which such election is to take place.

9. A list of candidates duly proposed shall, not less than ten clear days before each Annual General Meeting, be circulated to each Member by the Honorary Secretary.

10. If more candidates are proposed than are to be elected to fill the office of Chairman, Vice-Chairmen, the Elected Members, the Honorary Secretary or the Deputy Honorary Secretary after 2007/2008 (Circular No. 016 /07), the election shall be by secret ballot.                                                                                              

11. Only Members shall be entitled to vote on such a ballot. Every Member entitled to vote may cast one vote in person or by proxy for every vacancy in the office to be filled.

12. The Chairman shall name the persons to count the votes (cast personally and by proxy), and to make a return thereof to him, and he shall determine all questions which may arise as to the validity of any ballot paper or any vote. In the case of an equality of votes on any ballot the Chairman shall have a casting vote or votes. The names of the persons so elected shall be published forthwith in such manner as the Chairman may determine.

13. If not more than one candidate each to the office of Chairman, Vice-Chairman, Honorary Secretary and Deputy Honorary Secretary (Circular No. 016/07) to be elected be proposed for election in accordance with the provisions of these present those candidates who have been duly so proposed shall be deemed to be elected. If not more than two candidates to the office of Vice-Chairmen to be elected be proposed for election in accordance with the provisions of these presents, those candidates who have been duly so proposed shall be deemed to be elected. If not more than the full number of Elected Members to be elected be proposed for election in accordance with the provisions of these presents those candidates who have been duly so proposed shall be deemed to be elected.

Vacation of the Office of Member of the Bar Council

14. The office of a Member of the Bar Council shall be vacated:-

(a) If he ceases to be a Member.
(b) If by notice in writing to the Honorary Secretary he resigns his office.
(c) If he absents himself from meetings of the Bar Council or of the Special Committees to which he may be appointed by the Bar Council, for a period of two months without special leave of absence from the Bar Council.

Powers and Proceedings of the Bar Council

15. The Bar Council shall carry into effect the objects for which the Bar Association is constituted as hereinbefore set forth in such manner and by such means as it may determine, subject nevertheless to any regulation of these presents and to such rules and directions not inconsistent with the aforesaid regulations as may be prescribed by the Bar Association in General Meeting, but no rules or direction made or given by the Bar Association in General Meeting shall invalidate any prior act of the Bar Council which would have been valid if such rule or direction had not been made or given.

16. In particular but without prejudice to the generality of the immediately preceding Regulation the Bar Council shall have power:-

(1) to appoint (with or without salaries) and remove such Assistants, Clerks, Servants or Agents of the Bar Association as may be deemed necessary or desirable;
(2) to apply the funds of the Bar Association for the purposes of assisting or benefitting law students, law graduates, pupils, barristers and other persons who qualify for assistance or benefit under any Fund established under the auspices of the Hong Kong Bar Association.

17. The Chairman shall preside at all meetings of the Bar Council at which he shall be present, but if he be absent, the Vice-Chairman (or if there be more than one Vice-Chairman, the Senior Vice-Chairman) or if the Vice-Chairman (or if there be more than one Vice-Chairman, both the Senior Vice-Chairman and the Vice-Chairman) in turn be absent, the Senior Elected Member shall act as Chairman of such meeting. Seniority shall be measured, in regard to the Inner Bar, by the date of appointment as a Senior Counsel in Hong Kong and in regard to the Outer Bar by the date of admission in Hong Kong as a barrister.

18. The Bar Council may hold meetings, adjourn or otherwise regulate its meetings as it thinks fit provided that the Bar Council shall meet at least once in every calendar month at such time and place as the Chairman shall direct save and except during the Long Vacation during which no meeting need be held. Six Members of the Bar Council shall constitute a quorum. Questions arising at any meeting shall be decided by a majority of votes cast by the Chairman, Vice-Chairman or Vice-Chairmen, Honorary Secretary, Deputy Honorary Secretary, Elected and co-opted Members present and voting. In case of an equality of votes the Chairman of the meeting shall have a second or casting vote.

19. The Bar Council may at any time and from time to time appoint any Member to fill a casual vacancy in the Elected Members and any Members so appointed shall retain his office so long as the Elected Member of the Bar Council in whose place he is appointed would have held the same had he continued in office or until the Annual General Meeting next following the date of his appointment, whichever shall be the sooner.

20.

(a) The Bar Council may at any time and from time to time co-opt any Member as an Additional Member thereof provided that the number of persons so co-opted shall not exceed nine and provided that not more than half of the number of such Additional Members shall be of less than five years' standing. Not more than one Additional Member shall be an employed barrister who may be of more or less than 5 years' standing at the Bar. Any person so co-opted shall retain office only until the Annual General Meeting next following the date of his appointment.
(b) The Bar Council shall have power at any time to cancel such co-option.

21. The Bar Council may appoint Special Committees consisting of such Members and other barristers as it thinks fit, and any Special Committee so formed shall, in the execution of its duties, conform to any directions imposed on it by the Bar Council.

22.

(a) The Bar Council may at any time co-opt to its body any person or persons honoris causa, provided that notice of a proposal to co-opt a named person to be given at one of its meetings and decision by vote or otherwise be made at a succeeding meeting.
(b) Such co-opted persons shall have no right to vote at meetings, but may be invited to attend meetings of the Bar Council or be asked to offer such services as may from time to time be determined by the Bar Council.
(c) The Bar Council shall have power to cancel the co-option honoris causa of such persons.
(d) Regulation 14 (a) and (c) shall not apply to such persons.

23. The Bar Council shall cause proper minutes to be made of all appointments and co-options by the Bar Council and of the proceedings of all meetings of the Bar Association, the Bar Council, the Special Committees and the Standing Committees of the Bar Association, and of all business transacted at such meetings, and any such minutes of any meeting, if purporting to be signed by the chairman of such meeting or by the chairman of the next succeeding meeting, shall be sufficient evidence without further proof of the facts therein stated.

24. The continuing Members of the Bar Council may act notwithstanding any vacancy in their body; provided always that in case the Members of the Bar Council shall at any time be reduced to less than six, such continuing Member or Members may act only for the purpose of summoning a General Meeting of the Bar Association but not for any other purpose.

General Meeting of the Bar Association

25. A General Meeting of the Bar Association shall be held once in every calendar year on the Third Thursday in January and at such place and time as the Bar Council may determine. Such General Meetings shall be called Annual General Meetings. All other General Meetings of the Bar Association shall be called Extraordinary General Meetings.

26. The Bar Council may, whenever it thinks fit, and it shall, upon a request made in writing to the Honorary Secretary by not less than twenty Members, convene an Extraordinary General Meeting of the Bar Association. If the Bar Council does not within twenty-one days after the receipt by the Honorary Secretary of such request duly convene any such meeting, any twelve of those making the request may themselves convene an Extraordinary General Meeting. The request must state the precise objects of the meeting (including any resolution intended to be moved thereat) and must be signed by those making it, and may consist of several documents in like form each signed by one or more of such Members.

27. Not less than fourteen clear days' notice of any Annual or Extraordinary General Meeting shall be given to all Members entitled to receive notice of such meeting and shall be posted on the notice board in the Robing Room of the High Court. Such notice shall specify the place, the date and hour of such meeting but it shall not be necessary to specify in any such notice the nature of any business to be transacted or resolution to be proposed. The notice sent to Members shall specify the place, date and hour of such meeting and in the case of special business shall state the nature of such business. The accidental omission to give notice of a meeting, or of any business proposed to be transacted thereat, to, or the non-receipt of such notice by, any such Member shall not invalidate the proceedings of any General Meeting.

28. All business shall be deemed special business that is transacted at an Extraordinary General Meeting, and all that is transacted at an Annual General Meeting shall also be deemed special with the exception of the Accounts, Balance Sheet, the Annual Statement and the election of the Chairman, Vice-Chairman or Vice-Chairmen, Elected Members, the Honorary Secretary and the Deputy Honorary Secretary.

29. Any Member shall be at liberty to move the adoption of any resolution at any General Meeting provided that written notice thereof, together with sufficient copies for circulation to all Members then present in Hong Kong shall have been delivered in writing to the Honorary Secretary not less than ten clear days before the day of the Meeting. The Honorary Secretary shall, within seven clear days before the day of the Meeting, send a copy of such proposed resolution to each Member.

30. No business shall be transacted at any General Meeting unless a quorum is present at the time when the Meeting proceeds to business and, save as herein otherwise provided, a quorum shall be not less than twenty Members personally present and entitled to vote.

31. If within a quarter of an hour from the time appointed for a General Meeting a quorum be not present, the Meeting, if convened upon request pursuant to these presents, shall be dissolved. In any other case it shall stand adjourned to the same day in the next week at the same time and place or at such other time and place as the Chairman of the Meeting shall appoint; and if at such adjourned Meeting a quorum be not present within a quarter of an hour after the time appointed for the Meeting, those Members who are personally present shall constitute a quorum.

32. The Chairman shall preside as chairman of every General Meeting, and in his absence, the Vice-Chairman (or if there be more than one Vice-Chairman, the Senior Vice-Chairman) or, if the Vice-Chairman (or if there be more than one Vice-Chairman, both the Senior Vice-Chairman and the Vice-Chairman) in turn is absent, the Senior Elected Member shall act as Chairman of the Meeting. Seniority shall be determined in accordance with Regulation 17.

33.

(a) At a General Meeting no Member shall be permitted, without the consent of the Chairman of the Meeting, to speak more than once on the same question, except that the mover, or in his absence, the seconder of any resolution, shall be allowed to speak in reply.
(b) The mover or seconder of a resolution or of an amendment to a resolution at a General Meeting shall not, without the consent of the Chairman of the Meeting, speak for more than ten minutes.
(c) No other Member shall, without such consent, speak for more than five minutes.
(d) At any stage after a resolution has been moved and seconded any Member who has not spoken on the resolution may, unless the Chairman of the Meeting rules otherwise, move - "That the question be now put." Such motion if formally seconded shall be put forthwith and without debate and the provisions in Regulation 35 for a ballot shall not apply. If this motion is carried the mover of the resolution under debate or his seconder shall immediately proceed to exercise his right of reply and at the conclusion of such reply the resolution shall be put to the vote forthwith and without debate.
(e) Any Member who has given notice of a resolution pursuant to Regulation 29 may, without the consent of the Meeting, withdraw the resolution at any time before speaking to it. Thereafter he may withdraw it only with the leave of the Chairman of the Meeting which shall not be given if any Member present objects and before giving such leave the Chairman of the Meeting shall ask the Meeting if there is any such objection.
(f) No amendment of a resolution at a General Meeting shall be moved without the consent of the Chairman of the Meeting unless notice thereof shall have been given in writing to the Honorary Secretary not less than five clear days before the day of the Meeting.
(g) Whenever an amendment of a resolution at a General Meeting has been moved and seconded no second or subsequent amendment shall be moved until the first amendment shall have been disposed of.
(h) The Chairman of the Meeting may call the attention of the Meeting to any continued irrelevance or repetition or any breach of order on the part of a speaker and may direct such Member to discontinue his speech.

34. The Chairman of the Meeting may, with the consent of any General Meeting at which a quorum is present (and shall if so directed by the Meeting), adjourn the Meeting from time to time and from place to place, but no business shall be transacted at any adjourned Meeting other than business which might have been transacted at the Meeting from which the adjournment took place. When a Meeting is adjourned for twenty-one days or more not less than fourteen clear days' notice of the adjourned meeting shall be given in accordance with Regulation 27. Save as aforesaid it shall not be necessary to give any notice of an adjourned Meeting or of the business to be transacted thereat.

35.

(1) At all General Meetings a resolution put to the vote of the Meeting shall be decided on a show of hands by a majority of those Members present in person or by proxy and entitled to vote, unless before or upon the declaration of the result of a show of hands a ballot be demanded by at least one-half of those Members present in person or by proxy and entitled to vote, or by fifteen of them (whichever number be the less), and, unless a ballot be so demanded, a declaration by the Chairman of the Meeting that a resolution has been carried or not carried, or carried or not carried by a particular majority, shall be conclusive, and an entry to that effect in the Minute Book of the Bar Association shall be conclusive evidence thereof without proof of the number or proportion of the votes recorded in favour of or against such resolution.
(2) For the purposes of the foregoing sub-paragraph, the Chairman of the Meeting shall determine the manner in which proxies (if any) are voted on a show of hands or by ballot.

36. The result of any resolution may be made public if, and in such manner as, the Chairman of the Meeting shall direct.

37. No ballot shall be demanded on any question of adjournment.

38. All General Meetings shall be conducted under the direction of the Chairman of the Meeting thereof, whose ruling in any matter whatsoever concerning the conduct of the Meeting shall, if not inconsistent with the Regulations, be final.

39. In the case of an equality of votes, whether on a show of hands or on a ballot, the Chairman of the Meeting shall be entitled to a second or casting vote.

Voting at General Meeting

40. Every Member who has paid the annual prescribed fee shall be entitled to notices of and to attend and vote (in person or by proxy as provided for in Regulation 40A hereof) at General Meetings and shall have one vote. A Member who is an employed barrister shall not be entitled to vote on:

(a) Any resolution which seeks to rescind, amend, replace or add to any of the Regulations and By-Laws of the Bar Association and
(b) Any resolution which in the opinion of the Chairman of the Meeting is a resolution which relates to the objects of the Bar Association as set out in Regulation 2(a) hereof.

40A.

(1) One form of proxy shall be sent by the Bar Council to each Member (in accordance with Regulation 43) together with the Notice convening any General Meeting for use by such Member for the purpose of authorising another Member to vote on his behalf at such General Meeting.
(2) The Bar Council shall determine the contents of such forms of proxy and may enable the Member by such proxy to authorise the proxy holder to vote as he thinks proper or to vote in a particular manner.
(3) Each Member may only give one proxy for any one meeting at which he wishes to be represented, using only the form sent to him by the Bar Council for the purpose of that Meeting or an exact copy thereof, provided that such proxy form or such copy is duly signed by such Member and his proxy holder is another Member entitled to attend such meeting.
(4) Any Member wishing to act as proxy holder for another Member shall:-

(a) within 20 minutes immediately prior to the time of the Meeting specified in the Notice convening the relevant Meeting (unless an extension of time is permitted by the Chairman of the Meeting), at the place specified for such meeting, lodge all proxies held by him with the persons appointed by the Chairman for verifying such proxies. All such proxies whether in the original form as sent to him by the Bar Council or an exact copy thereof as provided under Sub-regulation (3) hereof shall bear the original signature of the Member giving the proxy;
(b) vote such proxies by using ballot papers supplied to him for such purpose or in such other manner as the Chairman of the Meeting shall determine.

(5) The Chairman of the Meeting shall determine all questions which may arise as to the validity of any form of proxy or of the entitlement of any person claiming to act as proxy holder so to act.
(6) A proxy given for a particular meeting may be used at any adjournment of that meeting in the absence of the Member giving such proxy.
(7) Where a proxy gives specific direction as to voting, the proxy holder shall be entitled to vote at his discretion on resolutions put to the meeting which are not dealt with in the proxy.

41. An Associate Member shall be entitled to receive notice of any Annual General Meeting of the Bar Association and to attend the same and to receive notice or documents relating to social functions, the annual statement and the result of the elections held at the Annual General Meeting and such other notices or documents as the Bar Council may in its discretion deem desirable. An Associate Member shall not be entitled to vote at any Annual General Meeting or to attend any Extraordinary General Meeting (except by written invitation of the Bar Council) or to vote thereat.

Members of the Bar Mess

42. Any barrister who is a member of the Judiciary in Hong Kong may, upon payment of the prescribed annual fee and so long as he pays the said annual fee, be and remain a Member of the Bar Mess (hereinafter referred to as "Mess Members") until he resigns or ceases to be a member of the Judiciary. A Mess Member shall be entitled only to attend social functions.

Academic Members and Student Members

42A.

(1) Any academic staff of legal education of any established universities or institutions in Hong Kong ("the Institutions") may, upon payment of the prescribed annual fee and so long as he pays the said annual fee, be and remain an Academic Member of the Bar Association (hereinafter referred to as "Academic Members") until he resigns or ceases to be an academic staff of one of the Institutions.
(2) Any student studying law or law related degrees or courses may, upon payment of the prescribed annual fee and so long as he pays the said annual fee, be and remain a Student Member of the Bar Association (hereinafter referred to as "Student Members") until he ceases to be such a student. (Circular 010/03)
(3) Academic Members and Student Members shall be entitled only to receive such information as the Bar Council may in its discretion deem desirable, to attend social functions and to participate in seminars, talks and workshops organized by the Bar Association and such activities as from time to time the Bar Council shall decide.

Notices

43.

(1) Every Member, Associate Member, Mess Member, Academic Member and Student Member shall give to the Honorary Secretary an address in Hong Kong at which notices and documents may be served upon him. In default of providing such an address, no Member shall be entitled to receive notices of general meetings and in the case of Associate Members notices of Annual General Meetings.
(2) Any notice or document may be served either personally or by leaving it or causing it to be left at such address or by sending it through the post in a prepaid envelope addressed to such Member, Associate Member, or Mess Member, Academic Member or Student Member (Circular 84/99) at such address. Where a notice or document is sent by post, service thereof shall be deemed to be effected by properly addressing, prepaying and posting the same or an envelope containing the same, and to have been effected in the case of a notice of a meeting at the expiration of 48 hours after such notice or the envelope containing the same is posted, and in any other case at the time at which the notice or document or the envelope containing the same would be delivered in the ordinary course of post.

44. All notices or other documents required to be served hereunder may also be posted up at such place or places as the Chairman may direct.

Accounts

45. The Bar Council shall cause a record to be kept:-

(a) Of all sums of money received and expended by the Bar Association and the matters in respect of which such receipts and expenditure take place.
(b) Of the assets and liabilities of the Bar Association.

46. The books of account shall be kept by the Honorary Secretary and shall be open to the inspection of the Members of the Bar Council.

47. Monies of the Bar Association derived from subscriptions or other sources shall be employed in such manner as the Bar Council may from time to time direct.

48. The Bar Council shall at every Annual General Meeting of the Bar Association cause to be produced accounts and a balance sheet in respect of the assets and liabilities of the Bar Association.

Operation of these Regulations

49. These presents came into force on the 1st March, 1968 with amendments up to the 20th January, 2011.

Alterations of Regulations

50. The Bar Association in General Meeting may by Extraordinary Resolution rescind, amend or add to these presents.

BY-LAWS OF THE HONG KONG BAR ASSOCIATION

1. Life Membership

(a) The Bar Association may, in General Meeting, confer on any Member the title of Life Member and such person, whilst he is in Hong Kong, shall have all the privileges of a Member.
(b) The Bar Association may, in General Meeting, confer on any barrister (not being a Member) or any former or present member of the Judiciary of Hong Kong the title of Honorary Life Member. (Circular 012/12)
(c) Life Membership and Honorary Life Membership shall only be conferred by the Bar Association on persons who, in the opinion of the Bar Association, have rendered outstanding service to the Bar Association or to the administration of justice in Hong Kong.
(d) No person shall have conferred upon him the title of Life Member or Honorary Life Member unless notice of a proposal to confer such title (which proposal shall be made in writing signed by at least twenty Members of whom at least ten shall be Senior Counsel) has been given to the Honorary Secretary who shall then, subject to any direction of the Bar Council, include in the business of the first General Meeting of the Bar Association convened or to be convened for a date not less than twenty-one clear days after the receipt of the proposal a proposed resolution for the conferral of the title of Life Member or Honorary Life Member as proposed.
(e) Notwithstanding the provisions of (d) immediately above, the first Life Member of the Bar Association shall be Mr. Leo d'Almada e Castro, C.B.E., LL.D, Q.C.
(f) Life Members and Honorary Life Members shall not be required to pay any subscriptions or other fee to the Bar Association.

2. Resolutions [deleted]

3. Subscriptions

(1) The Bar Council is authorized to raise funds for the general purposes of the Bar Association by way of subscriptions from Members, Associate Members, Mess Members, Academic Members and Student Members (Circular 84/99) as hereinafter provided.
(2) For the year 1998 such subscriptions shall be in the following amounts, namely:-

Members
Senior Counsel $16,500
Juniors over 12 years' standing $ 7,150
Juniors 7 to 12 years' standing $ 5,280
Juniors 3 to 7 years' standing $ 3,255
Juniors under 3 years' standing $ 1,000

Associate Members (Senior Counsel) $ 5,000
Associate Members $ 1,000
Associate Members $ 300
(previously judges of High Court & District Court)

Mess Members $ 300

(2A) For the year 2000, subscriptions for Student Members shall be in the amount of $100 each and subscriptions for Academic Members shall be in the amount of $345 each. (Circular 84/99)
(3) In each subsequent year, the Bar Council shall be authorized to increase the then current rates of subscription by not more than 15 per cent without reference to the Bar Association in General Meeting.
(4) Every Member, Associate Member, Mess Member, Academic Member and Student Member shall:-

(a) in respect of subscriptions for the calendar year commencing 1st January 1995, pay to the Honorary Secretary his subscription no later than the 10th day of November 1994; and,
(b) in respect of all subsequent years, no later than the 1st day of November in each year, pay to the Honorary Secretary his subscription for the following calendar year;

in the above mentioned amounts or in such other amounts as the Bar Council or the Bar Association in General Meeting may, from time to time, prescribe, provided that in the case of new Members, Associate Members, Mess Members, Academic Members and Student Members, (Circular 84/99) first payment of subscription may be made within 21 days of their application to join.

(5) Notwithstanding the foregoing provisions of this By-Law, the Bar Council may at its absolute discretion reduce or waive the amount of such subscriptions payable by any barrister applying for membership of the Bar Association. (Circular 005/08)
(6) The subscriptions payable by junior members under 3 years’ standing for the year 2008 be retrospectively reduced to $500 and the Bar Council shall be authorized to refund to such members $550 each from the subscriptions already collected. (Circular 005/08)

4. Appointments and Co-options

Every candidate for co-option by the Bar Council as an Additional Member under Regulation 20 or for appointment to fill a casual vacancy in the Elected Members under Regulation 19 or for co-option of a person honoris causa under Regulation 22 shall be proposed and seconded by Members of the Bar Council who shall be responsible for obtaining the consent of such person. The fact that an appointment or co-option is to take place must appear on the Agenda Paper.

5. Meetings of the Bar Council

The place and time of meetings of the Bar Council shall be fixed by the Chairman and not less than four days' notice of each meeting shall be given by the Honorary Secretary to each Member of the Bar Council, unless the Chairman, in any case of emergency, shall otherwise direct, or all the Members of the Bar Council agree.

6. Notice of any matter to be placed on the Agenda Paper shall be sent to the Honorary Secretary at least three days before the meeting, together with the name of the sender provided that if half the Elected Members present and entitled to vote agree, and the Chairman of the meeting consents, any other business may be discussed and, if thought fit, resolved at such meeting. The Agenda Paper shall be circulated to all Members of the Bar Council at least one day before each meeting of the Bar Council.

7. No previous resolution of the Bar Council shall be rescinded or amended except by a resolution passed by the Bar Council by a majority of two thirds of the Members of the Bar Council present and voting.

8. Standing Committees

[paras. 8 to 16 - deleted]

17. Powers and Proceedings of Standing Committees

[paras. 17 to 23 - deleted]

24. Disqualification of Members of Standing Committees

[paras 24 and 25 - deleted]

26. Receipts and Payments

The Honorary Secretary shall keep a bank account in the name of the Bar Association to which all monies received from the Bar Association shall be paid.

27. All payments shall be made, so far as possible, by cheque.

28. Operation of these By-Laws

These By-Laws came into force on the 1st March, 1968 with amendments up to the 19th January, 2012.

29. Alteration of By-Laws

No By-Law shall be rescinded or amended and no new By-Law shall be enacted except by a resolution passed by a majority of two-thirds of the Members as, being present in person or by proxy and entitled so to do, vote at a General Meeting of the Bar Association of which fourteen clear days' notice shall have been given specifying the resolution.